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Posts tagged Georgian Era (111)
Nos 71 to 80
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Charles Avison
Modern History
Sharp’s Castle
At Bamburgh, John Sharp organised free healthcare and education, bargain groceries, and the world’s first coastguard service.

BAMBURGH Castle was the property of the Crown until 1610, when its guardians, the Fosters, were granted ownership in recognition of long service. But it was a shadow of its former glory, and to make matters worse, Tom Foster made the two-fold error of getting into debt and backing the Jacobite Rebellion of 1715.

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No. 71
Charles Avison
Discovery and Invention
The Tanfield Railway
Opened in 1725, the Tanfield Railway is one of the oldest railways still operating anywhere in the world.

‘TYNESIDE roads’ was the name given to a network of 17th century wooden-track railways around the North East.

One of these was opened at Lobley Hill near Gateshead in 1647, and horses trundled coal along the wagonway to Dunston staiths on the Tyne, to be loaded on collier ships.

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No. 72
Muzio Clementi
Music and Musicians
‘God Save the King!’
The simple melody of the United Kingdom’s national anthem has stirred the souls of some great composers.

THE acclamation ‘God Save the King’ has been sung at every English coronation since Edgar in 973, but the song known today as the national anthem of the United Kingdom is much more recent, appearing for the first time in the ‘Gentleman's Magazine’ of 1745.

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No. 73
Ignaz Moscheles
Discovery and Invention
King George III (1760-1820)
Earl Stanhope and the Re-Invention of Printing
Britain never knew she was a nation of voracious readers until printing entered the steam age.

UNTIL the end of the 18th century, printing remained a laborious, inky and unreliable affair. The first major advance on the Gutenberg press came from Charles, Earl Stanhope, who in 1798 produced an iron press.

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No. 74
Muzio Clementi
Napoleonic Wars
King George III (1760-1820)
Captain Moorsom’s ‘Revenge’
The Whitby man held his nerve to keep five enemy ships busy at Trafalgar, and subsequently led Nelson’s funeral procession.

AS soon as battle was joined at Trafalgar, Robert Moorsom, captain of HMS Revenge, alarmed his crew by sailing directly towards five enemy ships.

He had few forward-firing cannon, and the broadsides of the enemy tore through Revenge’s rigging and across her deck without reply, while Moorsom strolled among the flying splinters ‘as though walking to church’.

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No. 75
Muzio Clementi
Discovery and Invention
The Geordie Lamp
The engineer put his own life on the line for the safety of his fellow-workers in the coal industry.
Based on an account by Samuel Smiles
(1812-1904)

ONE day in 1814, panic-stricken pitmen burst into George Stephenson’s cottage yards from Killingworth colliery. The pit was on fire!

Stephenson led them to the pit-head, descended the shaft and, with every man looking at him expectantly, called for volunteers.

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No. 76
John Field
Discovery and Invention
King George III (1760-1820) to Queen Victoria (1837-1901)
Sir Humphry Davy
A Cornish professor of chemistry with a poetic turn who helped make science a popular fashion.

AS a boy in Penzance, Humphry Davy delighted in legends and poetry, but he also had a knack for machinery, and spent hours in his grandfather’s dispensary fiddling about with chemicals.

“This boy” the surgeon said good-humoredly, “will blow us all into the air”.

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No. 77
Charles Avison
Music and Musicians
Charles Avison
The most important English-born composer of Handel’s day, known for his tuneful music and very busy diary.
Music by Charles Avison
(1709-1770)

WHILE in the employment of Ralph Jenison, MP for Northumberland, Charles Avison found time to develop an interest in music, encouraged at home by his father Richard; and on March 20, 1734, he was rewarded with a concert in Hickford’s Room, London, and time to study in the capital with Francesco Geminiani.

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No. 78
Elias Parish Alvars
Music and Musicians
Elias Parish Alvars
Eli Parish of Teignmouth in Devon became one of Europe’s most celebrated virtuosos.
Music by Elias Parish Alvars
(1808-1849)

THE year 1818 was a momentous one for the ten-year-old Eli Parish.

That was the year he gave his first harp concert, in his hometown of Teignmouth, Devon; and it was also the year that his father was declared bankrupt.

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No. 79
Muzio Clementi
Admiral Horatio Lord Nelson
King George III (1760-1820)
The Character of Horatio Lord Nelson
High praise from someone who knew him better than most.
By The Revd Alexander Scott
(1768-1840)

LET the country mourn their hero; I grieve for the loss of the most fascinating companion I ever conversed with — the greatest and most simple of men — one of the nicest and most innocent — interesting beyond all, on shore, in public and even in private life.

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No. 80
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Polywords (183)
Make as many words as you can from the letters of a nine-letter word.
Latest: Weir
Added on Sunday January 14th, 2018
Doublets (34)
Turn one word into another, changing just one letter each time.
Latest: Stardust
Quickwords (46)
A mini-crossword of everyday vocabulary and general knowledge.
Triplets (23)
Find one common letter that will turn three words into three new ones.
Latest: Triplet No. 23
Guess these words letter by letter – before the cats are gone!
See how ingenious you can be in combining three randomly chosen words in one sentence.
Compose sentences showing the difference in meaning, grammar or usage between these words.
Practise your basic arithmetic, from multiplation tables to percentages.
Latest: Target Number
Take command of English grammar and composition with these traditional exercises.
Latest: Letters Game
A word search game with a dash of strategy.
From our Archive
By Rudyard Kipling
(1865-1936)
A heartfelt plea for humility at the height of Britain’s Empire.
The USSR tried to draw Israel into the Cold War with the West, but Israel proved it could take care of itself.
Sometimes it is right to ‘turn a blind eye’.
By Frederick Marryat
(1792-1848)
Mr Easy believes he has missed out on fatherhood, and having nothing else to do, turns to political campaigning.
By Fulke Greville, Baron Brooke
(1554-1628)
Elizabethan courtier and soldier Sir Philip Sidney shows that a nobleman can also be a gentleman.

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History (406)
Polywords (183)
Georgian Era (111)
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Quickwords (46)
Doublets (34)
Railways (23)
Triplets (23)
Stuart Era (17)
Tudor Era (11)
Adam Smith (10)
Polyword ‘Green’
Make as many words as you can with the letters below. All your words must be at least four letters long, and must also include the highlighted letter. What’s the nine-letter word?

SEE how many words you can make using the letters below. All your words must be at least 4 letters long, and must include the letter (change).

We found commonly used words, plus one 9-letter word. Can you do better?

Use each letter only once. But if there are e.g. two As, you can used them both.

Don’t count proper nouns such as April, Zeus, or Newcastle (pretty much anything that has to be spelled with a capital letter at the start), or acronyms like HMRC.

Don’t just add -S for plurals or third person singular verbs, e.g. CAT → CATS or SPEAK → SPEAKS.

More Word Games
A word search game with a dash of strategy.
Guess these words letter by letter – before the cats are gone!
Do you know ‘a river, part of the Bristol-London waterway’ (6 letters), and ‘e.g. D minor’ (3 letters)?
Changing one letter at a time, see if you can start with FALL and finish with RISE.
Find the magic letter that can change three words into three different ones.