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Posts tagged Mediaeval History (63)
Nos 41 to 50
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2 two-part story
Muzio Clementi and Sir Hubert Parry
Magna Carta
King John (1199-1216)
The Signing of the Great Charter
King John promised his nobles respect, but he was not a man to regard his word as his bond.

AS the thirteenth century opened, King John of England was losing the support of his noblemen, the barons. High taxes, unsuccessful military campaigns in France, and persistent disagreements with the Pope became a source of anxiety and grievance.

So the Barons met the King at Runnymede in Surrey on June 15th, 1215, and handed him a document to sign.

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No. 41
John Field
Anglo-Saxon History
Welcome to Micklegarth
After the Norman Conquest, thousands of worried Englishmen departed for a new life in the Byzantine world.

AFTER the Norman conquest of 1066, hopes that Sweyn II of Denmark might invade (many in England were of Scandinavian stock) came to nothing when King William bought him off. So several dispossessed English earls assembled a fleet of two or three hundred ships, and left home for ever.

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No. 42
George Frideric Handel
Bible and Saints
Anglo-Saxon Britain (410-1066)
High Beneath Heaven’s Roof
The Cross of Christ speaks, and tells of the amazing transformation from sign of shame to sign of redemption.
By Cynewulf
(8th century)

“NOW the time has come for men far and wide upon this earth to have me in veneration, and for the whole, wonderful creation to make its prayers to this Standard.

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No. 43
Sir William Sterndale Bennett
Anglo-Saxon History
King Alfred the Great (871-899)
Alfred Learns To Read
Even as a child, King Alfred couldn’t resist a challenge.
By Charles Dickens
(1812-1870)

AT twelve years old, Alfred had not been taught to read; although, of the sons of King Ethelwulf, he, the youngest, was the favourite.

But he had — as most men who grow up to be great and good are generally found to have had — an excellent mother.

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No. 44
2 two-part story
George Frideric Handel
Anglo-Saxon History
Anglo-Saxon Britain (410-1066)
King Edwin and the Hand of Destiny
Forced from his throne and threatened with murder, Edwin makes a curious bargain for his deliverance.
Based on an account by Saint Bede of Jarrow
(672-735)

EDWIN should have inherited the crown of Deira from his father Ælle. Instead, Edwin’s brother-in-law Æthelfrith, King of neighbouring Bernicia, emerged as King of a new and powerful joint kingdom called Northumbria, and Edwin was driven out.

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No. 45
John Playford
Norman Era
King Stephen (1135-1154)
The Tichborne Dole
The strange-but-true story of a Lady Day tradition.

BACK in the twelfth century, as Lady Mabella Tichborne lay dying she asked her husband to give the peasants on his estates a free gift of flour every year on Lady Day.

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No. 46
Johann Baptist Cramer
Mediaeval History
The Wars of the Roses
A struggle between rival Royal Houses during the 15th century

KING Edward III had a son named Edmund of Langley, Duke of York, and another named John of Gaunt, Duke of Lancaster.

Their descendants Richard, Duke of York, and King Henry VI, of the House of Lancaster, were rivals for the throne of England.

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No. 47
2 two-part story
John Stanley
Mediaeval History
King Henry VI (1422-1461, 1470-1) to King Edward IV (1461-1483)
Richard of York: One Hand on the Throne
The Wars of the Roses pitted two royal houses against each other for the crown of England.
Based on an account by Charles Dickens
(1812-1870)

KING Henry VI suffered from periodic insanity, and his Queen, Margaret of Anjou, was the power behind his throne.

Neither was popular. Many people were glad that after capturing the King at St Albans on May 22nd, 1455, Richard, Duke of York, left Margaret no choice but to reinstate him as Lord Protector, governing in Henry’s stead.

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No. 48
Sir Hubert Parry
Mediaeval History
King Henry II
The great-grandson of William the Conqueror, whose knights assassinated Thomas Becket and whose family harried him to an early grave.

AFTER the death of Henry I, his daughter Matilda was denied the crown by her cousin Stephen, and their stubborn rivalry left England and Wales in chaos.

Stephen died childless in 1154, but Matilda’s son Henry II moved quickly to restore order, both at home and in northern France.

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No. 49
Mediaeval History
The Disaster of the White Ship
The loss of the heir to the throne threw England into crisis.

IN 1120, when William Adelin was sixteen, his father King Henry I took him across the Channel to be married to Matilda of Anjou, daughter of a powerful rival in northern France.

After the wedding, Henry went on ahead, leaving his son to sail home in the White Ship, the newest and fastest vessel in the royal fleet.

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No. 50
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Polywords (183)
Make as many words as you can from the letters of a nine-letter word.
Latest: Weir
Added on Sunday January 14th, 2018
Doublets (34)
Turn one word into another, changing just one letter each time.
Latest: Stardust
Quickwords (46)
A mini-crossword of everyday vocabulary and general knowledge.
Triplets (23)
Find one common letter that will turn three words into three new ones.
Latest: Triplet No. 23
Guess these words letter by letter – before the cats are gone!
See how ingenious you can be in combining three randomly chosen words in one sentence.
Compose sentences showing the difference in meaning, grammar or usage between these words.
Practise your basic arithmetic, from multiplation tables to percentages.
Latest: Target Number
Take command of English grammar and composition with these traditional exercises.
Latest: Letters Game
A word search game with a dash of strategy.
From our Archive
One of the best-known of all battles in English history, but not because of the conflict of which it was a part.
A reminder that those with extreme wealth and power have everything but the peace to enjoy it.
By William Wordsworth
(1770-1850)
God’s covenant of love is a fresh joy every time it appears.
A girl’s choice of words sees her turned out of hearth and home.
Today, the slave trade is a £150bn global business. Back in the late 18th century, it was making a lot of influential people very rich too, but some in England were determined to stop it.

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Adam Smith (10)
Polyword ‘Pied’
Make as many words as you can with the letters below. All your words must be at least four letters long, and must also include the highlighted letter. What’s the nine-letter word?

SEE how many words you can make using the letters below. All your words must be at least 4 letters long, and must include the letter (change).

We found commonly used words, plus one 9-letter word. Can you do better?

Use each letter only once. But if there are e.g. two As, you can used them both.

Don’t count proper nouns such as April, Zeus, or Newcastle (pretty much anything that has to be spelled with a capital letter at the start), or acronyms like HMRC.

Don’t just add -S for plurals or third person singular verbs, e.g. CAT → CATS or SPEAK → SPEAKS.

More Word Games
A word search game with a dash of strategy.
Guess these words letter by letter – before the cats are gone!
Do you know ‘complaint’ (4 letters), and ‘be the right size and shape for a space’ (3 letters)?
Changing one letter at a time, see if you can start with NEAT and finish with TIDY.
Find the magic letter that can change three words into three different ones.