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Posts tagged Modern History (139)
Nos 1 to 10
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Ethel Smyth
International Relations
Queen Victoria (1837-1901)
The Din of Diplomacy
William Gladstone warns voters not to leave foreign policy in the hands of interventionist politicians.
By William Ewart Gladstone
(1808-1898)

THERE was a saying of an ancient Greek orator, who, unfortunately, very much undervalued what we generally call the better portion of the community — namely, women; he made a very disrespectful observation, which I am going to quote, not for the purpose of concurring with it, but for the purpose of an illustration. Pericles, the great Athenian statesman, said with regard to women, Their greatest merit was to be never heard of.

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No. 1
2 two-part story
George Frideric Handel
The Second World War
King George VI (1936-1952)
‘Please Respect our Traditions’
Archbishop Damaskinos of Athens took his wartime protest straight to the top.

DIMITRIS Papandreou was elected Archbishop Damaskinos of Athens in 1938. At that time, Greece was under a state of emergency declared by Prime Minister Ioannis Metaxas, whose Fascist sympathies Damaskinos emphatically did not share. The appointment was blocked, and Damaskinos was kept under house arrest in Salamina until the Germans came in 1941.

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No. 2
2 two-part story
Ernest Walker
Modern History
King Edward VII (1901-1910) to King George V (1910-1936)
Srinivasa Ramanujan
A maths prodigy from Madras became so wrapped up in his sums that he forgot to pass his examinations.

SUCH was Srinivasa Ramanujan’s passion for numbers that at eleven, two college maths students who lodged with his family in Kumbakonam, near Madras, could no longer satisfy his burning curiosity. At sixteen, he borrowed a book with thousands of problems in Algebra, Trigonometry, Geometry and Calculus, and worked out solutions for them all.

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No. 3
Thomas Linley the Younger
Modern History
King George III (1760-1820)
An Avoidable Tragedy
Adam Smith argued that the Bengal Famine of 1769 would have been much less of a tragedy under a free trade policy.
By Adam Smith
(1723-1790)

IN rice countries, where the crop not only requires a very moist soil, but where, in a certain period of its growing, it must be laid under water, the effects of a drought are much more dismal. Even in such countries, however, the drought is, perhaps, scarce ever so universal as necessarily to occasion a famine, if the government would allow a free trade.

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No. 4
2 two-part story
Francesco Geminiani
Modern History
King George III (1760-1820)
The Great Bengal Famine
The Governor of Bengal accused the East India Company of turning a crisis into a humanitarian catastrophe.

IN 1769, farming in Bengal was already in a weakened state after years of harassment by Maratha raiding parties, burning crops and destroying villages. Then heavy monsoon rains and a subsequent drought caused two rice harvests to fail.

Governor John Cartier could have done little about that. But in 1772, his successor Warren Hastings conducted an inquiry, and concluded that the Company had nonetheless gravely exacerbated the crisis.

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No. 5
2 two-part story
Samuel Coleridge-Taylor
Modern History
William Hall VC
Canadian sailor William Hall was summoned over to India to help face down the Indian Mutiny.

WILLIAM Hall volunteered for the Royal Navy in 1852, and saw action aboard HMS Rodney in the Crimea, at Inkerman and Sevastopol. Five years later, at the outbreak of the Indian Mutiny, he was in Hong Kong on HMS Shannon when she was urgently summoned to Calcutta, and towed 600 miles up the Ganges to Allahabad.

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No. 6
2 two-part story
Granville Bantock
Modern History
The Siege of Lucknow
During the Indian Mutiny, over a thousand men, women and children were trapped in the Commissioner’s residence at Lucknow.

IN 1857, sepoys in the service of the East India Company joined with Indian princes in the Indian Mutiny, angered by mismanagement and presumption in the Company’s handling of Bengal and of Oudh, a recent addition to the Company’s trophy cabinet.

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No. 7
2 two-part story
Jean-Baptiste Lully and Henry Purcell
Stuart Era
James II (1685-1689) to King William III (1694-1702)
The Nine Years’ War
King Louis XIV of France raised rebellion in Ireland to put his own man on the English throne.

IN 1688, envoys from England came to William, Stadtholder of the Dutch Republic, inviting him and his wife Mary to become King and Queen of England in place of Mary’s disgraced father, James II, who had fled to France. At once, William saw a chance to add England’s navy to his own and turn the tables on French King Louis XIV, a growing menace to small states along the French border as far as Italy and Spain.

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No. 8
2 two-part story
Sir John Blackwood McEwen
Stuart Era
James II (1685-1689) to Queen Mary II and King William III (1689-1694)
The Darien Scheme
The Parliament of Scotland tried to liberate itself from London’s strangling single market.

IN 1603, King James VI of Scotland became James I of England too, and he and his son Charles I held two crowns and summoned two Parliaments, Westminster and Edinburgh, until 1649 when Westminster had Charles summarily executed.

Two years later, the newly republican English Parliament then passed the first Navigation Act, shutting out Dutch competition in the belief that imports made the country poorer.

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No. 9
2 two-part story
William Byrd and John Dowland
Modern History
King James I (1603-1625)
The Voyage of ‘Mayflower’
A crackdown on dissent in England’s established Church drove a band of Nottinghamshire townspeople to seek new shores.

AT the Hampton Court Conference in 1604, King James I insisted that the English Church would never adopt the more extreme views of Swiss reformer John Calvin. Some hardliners dubbed ‘Puritans’ were bitterly disappointed, and resolved to leave the country.

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No. 10
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Polywords (183)
Make as many words as you can from the letters of a nine-letter word.
Latest: Weir
Added on Sunday January 14th, 2018
Doublets (34)
Turn one word into another, changing just one letter each time.
Latest: Stardust
Quickwords (46)
A mini-crossword of everyday vocabulary and general knowledge.
Triplets (23)
Find one common letter that will turn three words into three new ones.
Latest: Triplet No. 23
Guess these words letter by letter – before the cats are gone!
See how ingenious you can be in combining three randomly chosen words in one sentence.
Compose sentences showing the difference in meaning, grammar or usage between these words.
Practise your basic arithmetic, from multiplation tables to percentages.
Latest: Target Number
Take command of English grammar and composition with these traditional exercises.
Latest: Letters Game
A word search game with a dash of strategy.
From our Archive
The long-lost monastery at Crayke in North Yorkshire was home to two saints with different but equally valuable gifts.
By Jane Austen
(1775-1817)
True moral integrity comes from within.
In 1381, fourteen-year-old King Richard II was faced with a popular uprising against excessive taxation and government meddling in the labour market.
A maths prodigy from Madras became so wrapped up in his sums that he forgot to pass his examinations.
The rest of Britain was paying dearly for job security and high wages in Britain’s agriculture industry.

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Tudor Era (11)
Adam Smith (10)
Polyword ‘Free’
Make as many words as you can with the letters below. All your words must be at least four letters long, and must also include the highlighted letter. What’s the nine-letter word?

SEE how many words you can make using the letters below. All your words must be at least 4 letters long, and must include the letter (change).

We found commonly used words, plus one 9-letter word. Can you do better?

Use each letter only once. But if there are e.g. two As, you can used them both.

Don’t count proper nouns such as April, Zeus, or Newcastle (pretty much anything that has to be spelled with a capital letter at the start), or acronyms like HMRC.

Don’t just add -S for plurals or third person singular verbs, e.g. CAT → CATS or SPEAK → SPEAKS.

More Word Games
A word search game with a dash of strategy.
Guess these words letter by letter – before the cats are gone!
Do you know ‘stout’ (6 letters), and ‘gloat’ (4 letters)?
Changing one letter at a time, see if you can start with FULL and finish with STOP.
Find the magic letter that can change three words into three different ones.