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Posts tagged Modern History (139)
Nos 101 to 110
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Charles Avison
Modern History
Sharp’s Castle
At Bamburgh, John Sharp organised free healthcare and education, bargain groceries, and the world’s first coastguard service.

BAMBURGH Castle was the property of the Crown until 1610, when its guardians, the Fosters, were granted ownership in recognition of long service. But it was a shadow of its former glory, and to make matters worse, Tom Foster made the two-fold error of getting into debt and backing the Jacobite Rebellion of 1715.

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No. 101
Edward Elgar
Modern History
King Edward VII (1901-1910)
The Man who Made the Headlines
William Stead conceived modern print journalism in the belief that newspapers could change the world.

WHEN William Stead became editor of ‘The Northern Echo’ in 1871, he was just 22 and the youngest newspaper-editor in the country.

He exploited Darlington’s railway connections to expand the newspaper’s circulation, helping William Gladstone’s Liberal Party to power in 1880.

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No. 102
Sir William Sterndale Bennett
Modern History
The Crimean War
It was the first war to be covered by embedded correspondents, and the public did not like what they read.

ON 31st May, 1853, Tsar Nicholas I of Russia dispatched troops to Moldavia and Wallachia, long a matter of dispute with the Ottoman Empire, ostensibly to bolster Orthodox Christians there.

After the Russians sank Turkish ships at Sinope on the Black Sea, Britain, Austria and France, fearing Russian expansion into the West, declared war on 28th March, 1854.

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No. 103
2 two-part story
Ignace Pleyel
French History
Mathieu Martinel and the Drowning Soldier
A young French cavalry soldier took a tremendous risk to rescue a drowning man.
Based on an account by Charlotte Yonge
(1823-1901)

IN 1820, Mathieu Martinel was in Strasbourg when he saw a fellow cavalryman had fallen into the river, right beside the weir of a churning mill-wheel. Martinel leapt straight into the turbid waters, and grabbed onto the drowning man.

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No. 104
Ignaz Moscheles
American History
The Pig-and-Potato War
In 1859, peaceful co-existence on the Canadian border was severely tested by a marauding pig.

THE Oregon Treaty of 1846 failed to make clear whether America or Britain governed the small but strategically important San Juan Island in the Gulf of Georgia, near Vancouver.

The diplomatic stand-off did not prevent American and British islanders alike living there peacefully until June 15, 1859, when Lyman Cutlar, an American farmer, shot a pig helping itself to his potatoes.

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No. 105
Edward Elgar
Sport History
King Edward VII (1901-1910)
West Auckland, European Champions
A team of amateurs gave Europe’s finest a drubbing.

IN 1909, Sir Thomas Lipton, a Scotsman of humble background who had made his fortune in tea, decided to organise a football competition for the best sides in Europe.

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No. 106
Franz Joseph Haydn
Modern History
The Battle of Waterloo
Napoleon’s idea of government was so oppressive that Wellington’s victory is one of the most important events in European history.

IN 1814, following a disastrous assault on Moscow and defeat in the Peninsular Wars at the hands of Arthur Wellesley, Napoleon was forced into exile as governor of Elba.

But after a few months, Napoleon simply collected a few hundred loyal men, and marched back to a hero’s welcome in Paris.

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No. 107
Ignaz Moscheles
History of Israel
King George V (1910-1936) to King George VI (1936-1952)
The Balfour Declaration of 1917
The former Prime Minister threw his weight behind a national home for Jewish people in their historic lands.

AFTER the defeat of the Ottoman Empire in the First World War, the region known then as Syria came under British control through the ‘Mandate for Palestine’.

The Mandate drew on the so-called ‘Balfour Declaration’ of 1917, a letter, dated 2nd November, from government minister Arthur Balfour to Walter Rothschild, a leading London banker and former MP for Aylesbury.

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No. 108
George Frideric Handel
Sir Winston S. Churchill
Winston Churchill’s Final Journey
The heroic and charismatic statesman’s last journey was replete with echoes of his extraordinary life.

SIR Winston Churchill, appointed Prime Minister in 1940 to lead Britain’s successful war effort against the Nazis, died on January 24, 1965, aged 90.

He was to be buried in Bladon, a village near Blenheim Palace in Oxfordshire where Churchill was born in 1874.

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No. 109
Muzio Clementi
Napoleonic Wars
King George III (1760-1820)
Captain Moorsom’s ‘Revenge’
The Whitby man held his nerve to keep five enemy ships busy at Trafalgar, and subsequently led Nelson’s funeral procession.

AS soon as battle was joined at Trafalgar, Robert Moorsom, captain of HMS Revenge, alarmed his crew by sailing directly towards five enemy ships.

He had few forward-firing cannon, and the broadsides of the enemy tore through Revenge’s rigging and across her deck without reply, while Moorsom strolled among the flying splinters ‘as though walking to church’.

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No. 110
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Polywords (183)
Make as many words as you can from the letters of a nine-letter word.
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Added on Sunday January 14th, 2018
Doublets (34)
Turn one word into another, changing just one letter each time.
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A mini-crossword of everyday vocabulary and general knowledge.
Triplets (23)
Find one common letter that will turn three words into three new ones.
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Guess these words letter by letter – before the cats are gone!
See how ingenious you can be in combining three randomly chosen words in one sentence.
Compose sentences showing the difference in meaning, grammar or usage between these words.
Practise your basic arithmetic, from multiplation tables to percentages.
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Take command of English grammar and composition with these traditional exercises.
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A word search game with a dash of strategy.
From our Archive
For centuries, northern countries from Russia to England have laid the catkins of the willow tree before Jesus as he enters Jerusalem.
By Samuel Smiles
(1812-1904)
However obscure a man may apparently be, his example to others inevitably shapes the future of his country.
By
N.L. Clay
Beware those who encourage ordinary people to be content with clumsy, SMS-style English.
Based on a fable by Jerome K. Jerome
(1859-1927)
A little fable of encouragement for all the suffering.
While spying out the enemy’s camp, Gideon hears something which fills him with renewed confidence.

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Polyword ‘Eve’
Make as many words as you can with the letters below. All your words must be at least four letters long, and must also include the highlighted letter. What’s the nine-letter word?

SEE how many words you can make using the letters below. All your words must be at least 4 letters long, and must include the letter (change).

We found commonly used words, plus one 9-letter word. Can you do better?

Use each letter only once. But if there are e.g. two As, you can used them both.

Don’t count proper nouns such as April, Zeus, or Newcastle (pretty much anything that has to be spelled with a capital letter at the start), or acronyms like HMRC.

Don’t just add -S for plurals or third person singular verbs, e.g. CAT → CATS or SPEAK → SPEAKS.

More Word Games
A word search game with a dash of strategy.
Guess these words letter by letter – before the cats are gone!
Do you know ‘conclusive evidence’ (5 letters), and ‘perceptive realisation’ (6 letters)?
Changing one letter at a time, see if you can start with LESS and finish with MORE.
Find the magic letter that can change three words into three different ones.