For learning. For inspiration. Or just for fun.
Posts tagged Modern History (139)
Nos 31 to 40
← Return to the Home Page
1 2 3 4 5 6 14
John Jenkins
Greek History
King Charles II (1649-1685)
The Lion of Piraeus
A marble statue in Venice bears witness to Europe’s long history of brave defeats and fruitless victories.

THE Arsenal at Venice is graced by two marble lions looted by Venetian commander Francesco Morsini from Piraeus, near Athens, in 1687. The lions, already a feature of the Greek port for fifteen centuries, were his trophies following a brief liberation of Athens and the Peloponnese from the Ottoman Empire.

Continue reading
No. 31
3 three-part story
George Frideric Handel
Modern History
Roman Empire (Byzantine Era) (330 - 1453)
Bede and the Paschal Controversy
The earliest Christians longed to celebrate the resurrection together at Passover, but that was not as easy as it sounds.

CHRIST died and rose again at Passover, the week-long Jewish festival at the first full moon of Spring. Christians had always wanted to celebrate Easter at that time each year, but no astronomer could determine the vernal equinox or full moon with precision.

Continue reading
No. 32
Niels Gade
Character and Conduct
King Charles II (1649-1685)
The Price of Treachery
A Danish soldier in the seventeenth century imposes the severest sentence he can think of.
Based on an account by Charlotte Yonge
(1823-1901)

A DANISH soldier from Flensburg was awaiting medical attention in the company of a bottle of beer when he turned to see a wounded Swede lying near him. So he cradled the man’s head and plied his bottle.

At that moment, there was a sharp crack! and a searing pain in his shoulder. The Swede had shot him. ‘Rascal!’ cried our kindly Dane, ‘for that you must be punished.’

Continue reading
No. 33
Eric Ball
Sport History
Rebel Rugby
The Nazi-collaborating Vichy government in France paid Rugby League the supreme compliment: they banned it.

IN 1940, Paris fell to the invading German army. Parts of France which were not actually occupied came under the authority of an extremely unpopular puppet government sympathetic to Nazi Germany, based in Vichy.

The influential men in Vichy were enthusiasts of the English sport of Rugby, because (they said) they admired its noble amateur code.

Continue reading
No. 34
George Hespe
Sport History
Rugby League
The less glamorous code of Rugby football, but the best for sheer speed and strength.

THE game of Rugby football developed at a Public school in the Warwickshire town of Rugby, early in the Victorian era. Soon it had spread across England, and competitions were organised by the Rugby Football Union, which insisted that players should be strictly amateur.

Continue reading
No. 35
2 two-part story
Johann Christian Bach
Modern History
Hyder Ali and Tipu
The British encountered no stouter resistance in India than Mysore’s gifted commmander Hyder Ali and his son, Tipu.

IN 1778, King Louis XVI of France declared war on Britain, and London responded by driving the colonial French out of the port of Mahé in Mysore, a kingdom in southwest India dating back to the turn of the fifteenth century.

This trespass incensed Hyder Ali, Mysore’s brilliant military commander whose hero status had already relegated King Krishnaraja Wodeyar II to a mere figurehead.

Continue reading
No. 36
George Butterworth
Christian Customs
King George V (1910-1936)
Mothering Sunday
Mothering Sunday is a peculiarly British celebration of Christian faith, close family and responsible freedom.

CONSTANCE Smith worked in a Nottingham dispensary for the Girls’ Friendly Society, helping young women without family support. In 1920, her experiences led her to campaign for the wider observance of Mothering Sunday.

Continue reading
No. 37
2 two-part story
Cipriani Potter and Alice Mary Smith
Liberty and Prosperity
King William IV (1830-1837) to King George V (1910-1936)
The Reform Acts
Nineteenth-century Britain had busy industrial cities and a prosperous middle class, but no MPs to represent them.

IN 1832, the controversial Reform Act was pushed through by Prime Minister Lord Grey. It was a wide-ranging overhaul of the way Britain voted for her MPs, necessitated by persistent abuse, and by the industrial revolution.

Continue reading
No. 38
2 two-part story
Nikolai Medtner
Modern History
Mysore’s Golden Age
The Princely State of Mysore (today in Karnataka) was hailed as an example of good governance to all the world.

KRISHNARAJA Wodeyar IV inherited the throne of Mysore in 1894, though his mother acted as regent until 1902. The Kingdom had a recent history of good governance, owing much to chief administrator Purniah from 1799 to 1812, and British Commissioner Sir Mark Cubbon from 1843 to 1861. A democratic legislature had been introduced in 1881.

Continue reading
No. 39
2 two-part story
Orlando Gibbons
Stuart Era
King Charles I (1625-1649)
Charles I and his Parliament
Charles took his rights and duties as a King with religious seriousness, but Parliament’s sense of both right and duty was just as strong.

IN 1625, Charles I inherited a kingdom torn apart by competing religious convictions and hatreds.

A century before, Henry VIII, chafing at political interference from Rome, had taken control of the English Church and blended its traditions with fashionably Protestant ideas from Switzerland.

Continue reading
No. 40
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14
Polywords (183)
Make as many words as you can from the letters of a nine-letter word.
Latest: Weir
Added on Sunday January 14th, 2018
Doublets (34)
Turn one word into another, changing just one letter each time.
Latest: Stardust
Quickwords (46)
A mini-crossword of everyday vocabulary and general knowledge.
Triplets (23)
Find one common letter that will turn three words into three new ones.
Latest: Triplet No. 23
Guess these words letter by letter – before the cats are gone!
See how ingenious you can be in combining three randomly chosen words in one sentence.
Compose sentences showing the difference in meaning, grammar or usage between these words.
Practise your basic arithmetic, from multiplation tables to percentages.
Latest: Target Number
Take command of English grammar and composition with these traditional exercises.
Latest: Letters Game
A word search game with a dash of strategy.
From our Archive
The Normans conquered England in 1066, and the country would never be the same again.
Loyal subjects of King James II continued to fight his corner after he, and any real hope of success, had gone.
A celebration of St Michael, captain of heaven’s angel host, courteous warrior, and healer.
James Hargreaves’s historic invention was not without its critics when it first appeared.
Based on a short story by Edith Nesbit
(1858-1924)
Mrs Tabby White thought she’d try some of the clever things her humans did.

A to Z Index

Top Topics
History (406)
Polywords (183)
Georgian Era (112)
Fiction (84)
Quickwords (46)
Doublets (34)
Triplets (23)
Railways (23)
Stuart Era (17)
Tudor Era (11)
Adam Smith (10)
Polyword ‘Ledge’
Make as many words as you can with the letters below. All your words must be at least four letters long, and must also include the highlighted letter. What’s the nine-letter word?

SEE how many words you can make using the letters below. All your words must be at least 4 letters long, and must include the letter (change).

We found commonly used words, plus one 9-letter word. Can you do better?

Use each letter only once. But if there are e.g. two As, you can used them both.

Don’t count proper nouns such as April, Zeus, or Newcastle (pretty much anything that has to be spelled with a capital letter at the start), or acronyms like HMRC.

Don’t just add -S for plurals or third person singular verbs, e.g. CAT → CATS or SPEAK → SPEAKS.

More Word Games
A word search game with a dash of strategy.
Guess these words letter by letter – before the cats are gone!
Do you know ‘bashful’ (3), and ‘an open area of shrubs and coarse grass’ (5)?
Change KEEP into MOAT, one letter at a time.
Find the magic letter that can change three words into three different ones.