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Posts tagged Modern History (139)
Nos 81 to 90
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2 two-part story
Charles Villiers Stanford
Modern History
Queen Victoria (1837-1901)
Florence Nightingale
Florence used her logical mind and society connections to save thousands of lives in the Crimean War.

AFTER reading distressing newspaper accounts of servicemen wounded in the Crimean War, Florence Nightingale, who at that time ran a women’s clinic in London, confided her frustrations to Sidney Herbert at the War Office.

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No. 81
Ralph Vaughan Williams
The Great War
King George V (1910-1936)
The Battle of the Somme
A British victory at tragic cost, in which both sides had to learn a new way of fighting.

THE first day of the Battle of the Somme, which began on the 1st of July, 1916, with the Battle of Albert, constituted a heavy defeat for the Germans, and overall the Somme was declared a victory for the Allies.

But the British lost over 60,000 men on that one day, the bloodiest in the history of the British Army.

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No. 82
Charles Villiers Stanford
The Second World War (1939-1945)
The Normandy Landings
‘D-Day’ on 6th June, 1944, kicked off the Allied invasion of Europe and raised hopes of an end to the Second World War.

ON 6th June 1944, the Allies set in motion Operation Overlord.

It started with Operation Neptune, landing thousands of soldiers from Britain, the Commonwealth and the United States on five beaches in Normandy, codenamed Utah and Omaha for the Americans, and Gold, Juno and Sword for the British.

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No. 83
Nikolai Medtner
The Second World War
King George VI (1936-1952)
The Bishop’s Gambit
The mayor and bishop of Zakynthos went to extraordinary lengths to protect the most vulnerable people of their island.

IT was in December 1943 that the anxious mayor of Zakynthos, Lukas Karrer, came to ask Bishop Chrysostom’s advice.

The Nazi commandant had given him seventy-two hours to compile a list of all the Jews of the island, a distasteful task as Karrer guessed that they would go to the Polish concentration camps.

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No. 84
John Marsh
Falkland Islands
The Falkland Islands
A proudly British group of islands far off in the South Atlantic.

IN 1690, a British expedition landed on a group of islands in the South Atlantic, and named the narrow strait that lies between the two largest of them after the Treasurer to the Navy, Lord Falkland.

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No. 85
Percy Grainger
Sport History
The Ashes of English Cricket
How the cricketing rivalry between England and Australia got its name.

IN 1882, a cricket team representing Australia defeated England by just seven runs in a match at the Oval in London, the first time Australia had beaten England on home soil.

The Sporting Times mourned the death of English cricket in a tongue-in-cheek Obituary, which ran:

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No. 86
George Frideric Handel
Napoleonic Wars
King George III (1760-1820)
The Battle of Trafalgar
At the cost of his own life, Lord Nelson showed Napoleon that he could rule neither Britain nor the waves.

IN 1805, the French fleet was not at its height. Many able officers had been executed in the Revolution, and memories were still raw of Nelson’s victory at the Battle of the Nile in 1798.

Napoleon therefore planned to ally with the Spanish fleet at Cadíz, before daring to confront the Royal Navy in the English Channel.

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No. 87
Ludwig van Beethoven
Modern History
The Peninsular War
Napoleon’s six-year-long campaign to bring Spain and Portugal into his united Europe was frustrated by Arthur Wellesley.

SPAIN rose up angrily on 2nd May 1808, after Napoleon occupied Madrid and put his brother Joseph on the Spanish throne.

Nelson had already inflicted a stinging defeat on Joseph off Cape Trafalgar near Cadíz in 1805, but this time Napoleon sent French troops with orders to teach the Spanish an unforgettable lesson.

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No. 88
Charles Villiers Stanford
History of Israel
King George V (1910-1936)
British Mandatory Palestine
The British had some difficulty fulfilling all the promises made to their wartime Allies.

ALTHOUGH the Ottoman Empire sided with Germany in the Great War, some Arab royalty in Ottoman-controlled Syria backed the Allies, and Colonel T.E. Lawrence promised them self-government should Britain win the war.

However, in 1917 details were leaked of the secret Sykes-Picot agreement, which proposed carving Ottoman Syria up between Britain and France.

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No. 89
Maurice Jarre
History of Israel
King George V (1910-1936)
Lawrence of Arabia
TE Lawrence persuaded Arab rebels to help overthrow the Ottoman Empire, but could not give them the independent Kingdom they craved.

DURING the Great War, the British sent Thomas Edward Lawrence, a Welsh army intelligence officer and expert on the Middle East, to work alongside Arab leaders smarting at Turkish domination.

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No. 90
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Polywords (183)
Make as many words as you can from the letters of a nine-letter word.
Latest: Weir
Added on Sunday January 14th, 2018
Doublets (34)
Turn one word into another, changing just one letter each time.
Latest: Stardust
Quickwords (46)
A mini-crossword of everyday vocabulary and general knowledge.
Triplets (23)
Find one common letter that will turn three words into three new ones.
Latest: Triplet No. 23
Guess these words letter by letter – before the cats are gone!
See how ingenious you can be in combining three randomly chosen words in one sentence.
Compose sentences showing the difference in meaning, grammar or usage between these words.
Practise your basic arithmetic, from multiplation tables to percentages.
Latest: Target Number
Take command of English grammar and composition with these traditional exercises.
Latest: Letters Game
A word search game with a dash of strategy.
From our Archive
By John Stuart Mill
(1806-1873)
J. S. Mill argues that free trade has done more to put an end to war than any political union or military alliance.
By Sir Ranjitsinhji Vibhaji of Nawanagar
(1872-1933)
Stylish batting in cricket is about variety, invention and frankly anything that works, and we have Dr W.G. Grace to thank for it.
Philip of Spain’s attempt to teach Elizabeth I a lesson did not go as planned.
Thomas Wright never earned more than a foreman’s wage, but he helped hundreds of prisoners back into society.
By Charles Dickens
(1812-1870)
English lawyer Sydney Carton goes to the guillotine in place of a French aristocrat.

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Polyword ‘Drink’
Make as many words as you can with the letters below. All your words must be at least four letters long, and must also include the highlighted letter. What’s the nine-letter word?

SEE how many words you can make using the letters below. All your words must be at least 4 letters long, and must include the letter (change).

We found commonly used words, plus one 9-letter word. Can you do better?

Use each letter only once. But if there are e.g. two As, you can used them both.

Don’t count proper nouns such as April, Zeus, or Newcastle (pretty much anything that has to be spelled with a capital letter at the start), or acronyms like HMRC.

Don’t just add -S for plurals or third person singular verbs, e.g. CAT → CATS or SPEAK → SPEAKS.

More Word Games
A word search game with a dash of strategy.
Guess these words letter by letter – before the cats are gone!
Do you know ‘street lined with tall buildings or trees’ (6 letters), and ‘shed’ (3 letters)?
Changing one letter at a time, see if you can start with FELL and finish with PONY.
Find the magic letter that can change three words into three different ones.