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Posts tagged Victorian Era (62)
Nos 41 to 50
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Percy Grainger
Sport History
The Ashes of English Cricket
How the cricketing rivalry between England and Australia got its name.

IN 1882, a cricket team representing Australia defeated England by just seven runs in a match at the Oval in London, the first time Australia had beaten England on home soil.

The Sporting Times mourned the death of English cricket in a tongue-in-cheek Obituary, which ran:

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No. 41
Charles Villiers Stanford
Music and Musicians
King Edward VII (1901-1910) to King George V (1910-1936)
‘Risoluto’
Despite setback after setback, Stanford was determined to hear his music played in public.
Music by Sir Charles Villiers Stanford
(1833-1897)

THE Leeds Festival of 1910 caused a stir with the appearance of Sergei Rachmaninoff as soloist in his own Second Piano Concerto, adding the Russian to a long list of overseas composers brought to England by the conductor, Sir Charles Villiers Stanford.

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No. 42
2 two-part story
Charles Villiers Stanford
Modern History
Grace Darling
Mild-mannered Grace Darling persuaded her father to let her help him rescue the survivors of a shipwreck.

IN the early hours of 7th September, 1838, the Forfarshire, a paddlesteamer laden with cotton, broke apart on Big Harcar, a rocky outcrop of the island of Outer Farne.

Distress flags flew and signal guns fired at Bamburgh Castle, but no lifeboat could escape the shore in the raging storm.

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No. 43
Charles Villiers Stanford
Discovery and Invention
Queen Victoria (1837-1901)
Cragside: the Home of Modern Living
Lord Armstrong’s home was an Aladdin’s cave of Victorian technology.

CRAGSIDE House was developed over several years by Victorian industrialist William Armstrong, starting in 1863.

A keen naturalist, he planted his land with seven million trees and shrubs, chiefly conifers and rhododendrons, and created what remains one of Europe’s largest rock gardens.

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No. 44
John Field
Discovery and Invention
King William IV (1830-1837)
How the British Invented Cool
Michael Faraday showed that gases could be compressed and evaporated to preserve food and make ice.

JANE Austen enjoyed eating ices and sipping French wine at her wealthy brother’s Godmersham home, courtesy of his ice-house, a brick-lined dome sunk into the ground, in which ice could remain frozen for years.

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No. 45
Ignaz Moscheles
American History
The Pig-and-Potato War
In 1859, peaceful co-existence on the Canadian border was severely tested by a marauding pig.

THE Oregon Treaty of 1846 failed to make clear whether America or Britain governed the small but strategically important San Juan Island in the Gulf of Georgia, near Vancouver.

The diplomatic stand-off did not prevent American and British islanders alike living there peacefully until June 15, 1859, when Lyman Cutlar, an American farmer, shot a pig helping itself to his potatoes.

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No. 46
Charles Villiers Stanford
Discovery and Invention
Queen Victoria (1837-1901)
The Iron Horse and the Iron Cow
Railways not only brought fresh, healthy food to the urban poor, they improved the conditions of working animals.
By Samuel Smiles
(1812-1904)

ONE of the most striking illustrations of the utility of railways in contributing to the supply of wholesome articles of food to the population of large cities, is to be found in the rapid growth of the traffic in Milk.

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No. 47
Alice Mary Smith
Liberty and Prosperity
A Nation’s Wealth
It is not politicians and their policies that create wealth, but the hard work and ingenuity of ordinary people.
By Richard Cobden
(1804-1865)

HOW can protection, think you, add to the wealth of a country? Can you by legislation add one farthing to the wealth of the country?

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No. 48
Johannes Brahms
Character and Conduct
Character and Learning
Intellectual learning is to be respected, but it should never be confused with good character.
By Samuel Smiles
(1812-1904)

IN the New Testament, appeals are constantly made to the heart of man and to "the spirit we are of," whilst allusions to the intellect are of very rare occurrence.

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No. 49
Elias Parish Alvars
Music and Musicians
Elias Parish Alvars
Eli Parish of Teignmouth in Devon became one of Europe’s most celebrated virtuosos.
Music by Elias Parish Alvars
(1808-1849)

THE year 1818 was a momentous one for the ten-year-old Eli Parish.

That was the year he gave his first harp concert, in his hometown of Teignmouth, Devon; and it was also the year that his father was declared bankrupt.

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No. 50
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Polywords (183)
Make as many words as you can from the letters of a nine-letter word.
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Turn one word into another, changing just one letter each time.
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A mini-crossword of everyday vocabulary and general knowledge.
Triplets (23)
Find one common letter that will turn three words into three new ones.
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Guess these words letter by letter – before the cats are gone!
See how ingenious you can be in combining three randomly chosen words in one sentence.
Compose sentences showing the difference in meaning, grammar or usage between these words.
Practise your basic arithmetic, from multiplation tables to percentages.
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Take command of English grammar and composition with these traditional exercises.
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A word search game with a dash of strategy.
From our Archive
By Jane Austen
(1775-1817)
Anne Elliot is mortified to hear Frederick Wentworth’s opinion of her, but manages to find comfort in his words.
French revolutionaries in a fleet of four ships attempted to spark a revolution in Britain.
Britain never knew she was a nation of voracious readers until printing entered the steam age.
King John promised his nobles respect, but he was not a man to regard his word as his bond.
By Samuel Smiles
(1812-1904)
An aristocratic statesman was choked with emotion as he reflected on Britain’s creative social mobility.

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Polyword ‘Eve’
Make as many words as you can with the letters below. All your words must be at least four letters long, and must also include the highlighted letter. What’s the nine-letter word?

SEE how many words you can make using the letters below. All your words must be at least 4 letters long, and must include the letter (change).

We found commonly used words, plus one 9-letter word. Can you do better?

Use each letter only once. But if there are e.g. two As, you can used them both.

Don’t count proper nouns such as April, Zeus, or Newcastle (pretty much anything that has to be spelled with a capital letter at the start), or acronyms like HMRC.

Don’t just add -S for plurals or third person singular verbs, e.g. CAT → CATS or SPEAK → SPEAKS.

More Word Games
A word search game with a dash of strategy.
Guess these words letter by letter – before the cats are gone!
Do you know ‘street lined with tall buildings or trees’ (6 letters), and ‘shed’ (3 letters)?
Changing one letter at a time, see if you can start with FLAG and finish with POLE.
Find the magic letter that can change three words into three different ones.