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Posts tagged Liberty and Prosperity (61)
Nos 31 to 40
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Johann Baptist Cramer
Liberty and Prosperity
Queen Victoria (1837-1901)
The Great Baby
Charles Dickens rails at the way Parliament and do-gooders treat the public like an irresponsible child.
By Charles Dickens
(1812-1870)

THERE are two public bodies remarkable for knowing nothing of the people, and for perpetually interfering to put them right. The one is the House of Commons; the other the Monomaniacs. Between the Members and the Monomaniacs, the devoted People, quite unheard, get harried and worried to the last extremity.

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No. 31
Cipriani Potter
Liberty and Prosperity
King George III (1760-1820) to Queen Victoria (1837-1901)
The Prisoner’s Friend
Thomas Wright never earned more than a foreman’s wage, but he helped hundreds of prisoners back into society.

WHEN Thomas Wright learnt that a fellow employee at the Manchester foundry where he worked was to be sacked just because he was an ex-convict, he put down £20 as a guarantee of the man’s good behaviour. But by the time Wright reached the man’s lodgings, bursting with good news, the poor fellow had packed up and fled.

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No. 32
Henry Purcell
Liberty and Prosperity
The Servants of One Master
Some people are not more equal than others, nor are they entitled to more liberty.
By John Locke
(1632-1704)

THE state of nature has a law of nature to govern it, which obliges every one: and reason, which is that law, teaches all mankind, who will but consult it, that being all equal and independent, no one ought to harm another in his life, health, liberty, or possessions.

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No. 33
Muzio Clementi
Liberty and Prosperity
A Little Common Sense
William Pitt the Elder doubts the wisdom of letting experts run the country.
By William Pitt the Elder
(1708-1778)

THERE is one plain maxim, to which I have invariably adhered through life; that in every question, in which my liberty or my property were concerned, I should consult and be determined by the dictates of common sense.

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No. 34
Liberty and Prosperity
The ‘Empire’ of Free Trade
Free trade brings to smaller nations all the advantages of empire without the disadvantages.
By Adam Smith
(1723-1790)

WERE all nations to follow the liberal system of free exportation and free importation, the different states into which a great continent was divided would so far resemble the different provinces of a great empire.

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No. 35
Franz Joseph Haydn
Liberty and Prosperity
Man was not made for the Government
Good government is not about enforcing uniform order, but about maximising liberty among a particular people.
By Edmund Burke MP
(1729-1797)

LIBERTY, too, must be limited in order to be possessed. The degree of restraint it is impossible in any case to settle precisely.

But it ought to be the constant aim of every wise public council to find out by cautious experiments, and rational, cool endeavours, with how little, not how much, of this restraint the community can subsist.

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No. 36
John Stanley
Liberty and Prosperity
The Bond of Liberty
Britain’s ‘empire’ owed its existence not to her armies or politicians but to her merchants and her unique brand of liberty.
By Edmund Burke MP
(1729-1797)

AS long as you have the wisdom to keep the sovereign authority of this country as the sanctuary of liberty, the sacred temple consecrated to our common faith, wherever the chosen race and sons of England worship freedom, they will turn their faces towards you. The more they multiply, the more friends you will have; the more ardently they love liberty, the more perfect will be their obedience.

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No. 37
Charles Avison
International Relations
The Jealousy of Trade
David Hume encourages politicians to put away their distrust of other countries, and allow free trade to flourish.
By David Hume
(1711-1776)

NOTHING is more usual, among states which have made some advances in commerce, than to look on the progress of their neighbours with a suspicious eye, to consider all trading states as their rivals, and to suppose that it is impossible for any of them to flourish, but at their expense.

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No. 38
Francesco Geminiani
Liberty and Prosperity
Out of Touch
William Pitt the Elder berates Parliament for treating the public like know-nothings.
By William Pitt the Elder
(1708-1778)

MY lords, I myself am one of the people. I myself am by birth an English elector, and join with the freeholders of England as in a common cause. Believe me, my lords, we mistake our real interest as much as our duty, when we separate ourselves from the mass of the people.

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No. 39
George Butterworth
Poets and Poetry
‘Sussex’
A meditation on our instinctive love for the place in which we live.
By Rudyard Kipling
(1865-1936)

GOD gave all men all earth to love,But since our hearts are small,Ordained for each one spot should proveBelovèd over all;That, as He watched Creation’s birth,So we, in godlike mood,May of our love create our earthAnd see that it is good.

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No. 40
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Polywords (183)
Make as many words as you can from the letters of a nine-letter word.
Latest: Weir
Added on Sunday January 14th, 2018
Doublets (34)
Turn one word into another, changing just one letter each time.
Latest: Stardust
Quickwords (46)
A mini-crossword of everyday vocabulary and general knowledge.
Triplets (23)
Find one common letter that will turn three words into three new ones.
Latest: Triplet No. 23
Guess these words letter by letter – before the cats are gone!
See how ingenious you can be in combining three randomly chosen words in one sentence.
Compose sentences showing the difference in meaning, grammar or usage between these words.
Practise your basic arithmetic, from multiplation tables to percentages.
Latest: Target Number
Take command of English grammar and composition with these traditional exercises.
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A word search game with a dash of strategy.
From our Archive
His alpaca-wool mills near Bradford proved the social benefits of private enterprise in the right hands.
Music by Sir Charles Villiers Stanford
(1833-1897)
Despite setback after setback, Stanford was determined to hear his music played in public.
The people of Penzance in Cornwall did not think an Algerian corsair much better than a French warship.
Napoleon’s six-year-long campaign to bring Spain and Portugal into his united Europe was frustrated by Arthur Wellesley.
Faraday’s work on electromagnetism made him an architect of modern living, and one of Albert Einstein’s three most revered physicists.

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Adam Smith (10)
Polyword ‘Otter’
Make as many words as you can with the letters below. All your words must be at least four letters long, and must also include the highlighted letter. What’s the nine-letter word?

SEE how many words you can make using the letters below. All your words must be at least 4 letters long, and must include the letter (change).

We found commonly used words, plus one 9-letter word. Can you do better?

Use each letter only once. But if there are e.g. two As, you can used them both.

Don’t count proper nouns such as April, Zeus, or Newcastle (pretty much anything that has to be spelled with a capital letter at the start), or acronyms like HMRC.

Don’t just add -S for plurals or third person singular verbs, e.g. CAT → CATS or SPEAK → SPEAKS.

More Word Games
A word search game with a dash of strategy.
Guess these words letter by letter – before the cats are gone!
Do you know ‘wallow in resentment’ (4 letters), and ‘English composer’ (4 letters)?
Changing one letter at a time, see if you can start with FAST and finish with SLOW.
Find the magic letter that can change three words into three different ones.