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Posts tagged Liberty and Prosperity (61)
Nos 51 to 60
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Ralph Vaughan Williams
The Second World War
King George VI (1936-1952)
Britain’s Destiny
In a Christmas broadcast in 1940, actor Leslie Howard explained why British sovereignty was worth fighting for.
By Leslie Howard
(1893-1943)

BRITAIN’S destiny has been to uphold tolerance in religion, thought, speech, and race – the mainspring of democracy. We have still far to travel on the road to true democracy, but only the Germans have made no progress in this direction.

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No. 51
Jan Ladislav Dussek
Liberty and Prosperity
The Small Compass
The role of government in a nation’s prosperity is important but limited.
By Jeremy Bentham
(1748-1832)

THE motto, or watchword of government, on these occasions, ought to be — Be quiet.

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No. 52
Sir William Sterndale Bennett
The Great War
King George V (1910-1936)
Kipling and ‘Agamemnon’
Both Rudyard Kipling and the Royal Navy saw Greek sovereignty as a universal symbol of freedom.

RUDYARD Kipling liked to pretend that he was hopeless at classical languages.

Yet he wrote half-a-dozen stories set in classical antiquity, and as the Great War drew to a close in 1918, sent to the ‘Telegraph’ a translation of the Greek national anthem, ‘Hymn to Liberty’, composed in 1823 as Greece fought for independence from the Turks.

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No. 53
Sir Hubert Parry
Poets and Poetry
‘If...’
A reflection on what builds real character
By Rudyard Kipling
(1865-1936)

IF you can keep your head when all about youAre losing theirs and blaming it on you,If you can trust yourself when all men doubt you,But make allowance for their doubting too;If you can wait and not be tired by waiting,Or being lied about, don’t deal in lies,Or being hated, don’t give way to hating,And yet don’t look too good, nor talk too wise:

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No. 54
Edward Elgar
Poets and Poetry
‘Hail, Liberty!’
Kipling borrowed from the Greek Independence movement to give thanks for the end of the Great War.
By Rudyard Kipling
(1865-1936)

WE knew thee of old,
Oh divinely restored,
By the light of thine eyes
And the light of thy Sword.

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No. 55
Alice Mary Smith
Liberty and Prosperity
A Nation’s Wealth
It is not politicians and their policies that create wealth, but the hard work and ingenuity of ordinary people.
By Richard Cobden
(1804-1865)

HOW can protection, think you, add to the wealth of a country? Can you by legislation add one farthing to the wealth of the country?

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No. 56
Sergei Rachmaninoff
Liberty and Prosperity
Queen Victoria (1837-1901)
The Repeal of the Corn Laws
The rest of Britain was paying dearly for job security and high wages in Britain’s agriculture industry.

AS overseas trade expanded in her growing empire, Britain’s domestic agriculture industry found itself suffering from competition with cheap imports.

Powerful farming interests lobbied Parliament into passing the Corn Laws in 1815, forbidding imports and guaranteeing high prices, high wages and a captive market for British farmers.

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No. 57
Liberty and Prosperity
There is no Liberty without Self-Control
Anti-Christian governments don’t make us free, they just impose their own, illiberal morality.
By Edmund Burke MP
(1729-1797)

MEN are qualified for civil liberty in exact proportion to their disposition to put moral chains upon their own appetites, - in proportion as their love to justice is above their rapacity, - in proportion as their soundness and sobriety of understanding is above their vanity and presumption, - in proportion as they are more disposed to listen to the counsels of the wise and good, in preference to the flattery of knaves.

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No. 58
International Relations
Peace By Free Trade
The blessing of trade free from political interference was one of most important insights in British, indeed world history.
By Richard Cobden
(1804-1865)

FREE Trade! What is it?

Why, breaking down the barriers that separate nations; those barriers, behind which nestle the feelings of pride, revenge, hatred, and jealousy, which every now and then burst their bounds, and deluge whole countries with blood. [...]

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No. 59
Francesco Geminiani
Liberty and Prosperity
‘No dog exchanges bones with another’
How do we get the help of millions of people we don’t know? Only by trade.
By Adam Smith
(1723-1790)

NOBODY ever saw a dog make a fair and deliberate exchange of one bone for another with another dog.

A spaniel endeavours by a thousand attractions to engage the attention of its master who is at dinner, when it wants to be fed by him. Man has not time, however, to do this upon every occasion.

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No. 60
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Polywords (183)
Make as many words as you can from the letters of a nine-letter word.
Latest: Weir
Added on Sunday January 14th, 2018
Doublets (34)
Turn one word into another, changing just one letter each time.
Latest: Stardust
Quickwords (46)
A mini-crossword of everyday vocabulary and general knowledge.
Triplets (23)
Find one common letter that will turn three words into three new ones.
Latest: Triplet No. 23
Guess these words letter by letter – before the cats are gone!
See how ingenious you can be in combining three randomly chosen words in one sentence.
Compose sentences showing the difference in meaning, grammar or usage between these words.
Practise your basic arithmetic, from multiplation tables to percentages.
Latest: Target Number
Take command of English grammar and composition with these traditional exercises.
Latest: Letters Game
A word search game with a dash of strategy.
From our Archive
Jesus’s apostles receive the gift of God’s Holy Spirit, and the startling effects quickly draw a crowd.
MacPherson’s tireless efforts to promote Russian sport earned him a unique Imperial honour, and the enmity of the Communists.
The experienced nurse could not stop saving lives, even at the cost of her own.
William Stead conceived modern print journalism in the belief that newspapers could change the world.
Prince Belshazzar’s disrespectful behaviour left him facing the original ‘writing on the wall’.

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Adam Smith (10)
Polyword ‘Tree’
Make as many words as you can with the letters below. All your words must be at least four letters long, and must also include the highlighted letter. What’s the nine-letter word?

SEE how many words you can make using the letters below. All your words must be at least 4 letters long, and must include the letter (change).

We found commonly used words, plus one 9-letter word. Can you do better?

Use each letter only once. But if there are e.g. two As, you can used them both.

Don’t count proper nouns such as April, Zeus, or Newcastle (pretty much anything that has to be spelled with a capital letter at the start), or acronyms like HMRC.

Don’t just add -S for plurals or third person singular verbs, e.g. CAT → CATS or SPEAK → SPEAKS.

More Word Games
A word search game with a dash of strategy.
Guess these words letter by letter – before the cats are gone!
Do you know ‘situation of a golf ball’ (3 letters), and ‘the capital of the State of New York’ (6 letters)?
Changing one letter at a time, see if you can start with FELL and finish with PONY.
Find the magic letter that can change three words into three different ones.