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Posts tagged Extracts from Literature (94)
Nos 31 to 40
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George Frideric Handel
Bible and Saints
Anglo-Saxon Britain (410-1066)
The Last Commandment
Northumbrian poet Cynewulf imagines the farewell between Jesus and his Apostles, forty days after his resurrection.
By Cynewulf
(8th century)

“BE glad of heart! Never shall I wander; my love shall follow you unceasingly. My might I give you, and I am with you always, even unto the end, that through my gift none shall ever lack God.”

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No. 31
Charles Villiers Stanford
Extracts from Literature
Happy Government
Lady Glencora scolds the Earl of Brentford for political inactivity, but he warns her to be careful what she wishes for.
By Anthony Trollope
(1815-1882)

“WHAT a nice, happy, lazy time you’ve had of it since you’ve been in,” said she to the Earl.

“I hope we have been more happy than lazy,” said the Earl.

“But you’ve done nothing. Mr Palliser has twenty schemes of reform, all mature; but among you you’ve not let him bring in one of them. The Duke and Mr Mildmay and you will break his heart among you.”

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No. 32
Johann Christian Bach
Extracts from Literature
Education of the Heart
For Jane Austen, the best education a father can give to his child is to befriend her.
By Jane Austen
(1775-1817)

TOO late he became aware how unfavourable to the character of any young people must be the totally opposite treatment which Maria and Julia had been always experiencing at home, where the excessive indulgence and flattery of their aunt had been continually contrasted with his own severity.

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No. 33
John Field
Extracts from Literature
Sense and Sensitivity
Jane Austen wrote as a Christian, but all the better for doing so unobtrusively.
By Richard Whately
(1787-1863)

MISS Austin has the merit (in our judgment most essential) of being evidently a Christian writer: a merit which is much enhanced, both on the score of good taste, and of practical utility, by her religion being not at all obtrusive.

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No. 34
John Jenkins
Extracts from Literature
The Blessing of Disguise
A mysterious knight and an equally mysterious outlaw agree to preserve one another’s incognito.
By Sir Walter Scott
(1771-1832)

“SIR Knight,” said the Outlaw, “we have each our secret. You are welcome to form your judgment of me, and I may use my conjectures touching you, though neither of our shafts may hit the mark they are shot at. But as I do not pray to be admitted into your mystery, be not offended that I preserve my own.”

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No. 35
2 two-part story
Camille Saint-Saens
Extracts from Literature
King George V (1910-1936)
Mr Ivery Gets Away
Richard Hannay tracks a German spy down to a French château, but Hannay’s sense of fair play gives his enemy a chance.
By John Buchan
(1875-1940)

‘HULLO, Mr Ivery,’ I said. ‘This is an odd place to meet again!’

In his amazement he fell back a step, while his hungry eyes took in my face. There was no mistake about the recognition. I saw something I had seen once before in him, and that was fear. Out went the light and he sprang for the door.

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No. 36
2 two-part story
Charles Villiers Stanford and Sir Arthur Sullivan
Extracts from Literature
Pangur Bán
A 9th century Irish monk scribbled some verses about a beloved cat into his copy book.
By Anonymous (Irish Monk)
(9th century)

I, AND Pangur Bán —
each doing what he does best:
his mind on the hunt,
mine on my own pursuits.

I love, better than fame, relaxing
with my texts, in painstaking study;
Pangur Bán does not envy me that:
he loves his own childish craft.

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No. 37
2 two-part story
Richard Jones
Lives of the Saints
King Ethelred the Unready (978-1016)
Tamed by Wisdom, Freed by Grace
Abbot Elfric expounds a Palm Sunday text to explain how Christianity combines orderly behaviour with intelligent and genuine liberty.
By Elfric of Eynsham
(955-1010)

AN ass is a foolish beast, and dirty, and stupid compared with other beasts, and strong for burdens. Such were men before Christ’s advent: foolish and dirty, while they served idols and various vices, and bowed down to the images they had fashioned themselves, and said to them, “Thou art my god.” And they bore whatever burden the devil laid on them.

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No. 38
2 two-part story
Charles Villiers Stanford
Extracts from Literature
Redeeming Time
Pip Pirrip never misses a moment of visiting time with Abel Magwitch, the convict who made him into a gentleman, in the prison hospital.
By Charles Dickens
(1812-1870)

“DEAR boy,” he said, as I sat down by his bed: “I thought you was late. But I knowed you couldn’t be that. God bless you! You’ve never deserted me, dear boy.”

I pressed his hand in silence, for I could not forget that I had once meant to desert him.

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No. 39
George Frideric Handel
Lives of the Saints
King Ethelred the Unready (978-1016)
Breaking Death
For Jesus Christ to step down alive from his cross would have been a mighty miracle, but not the mightiest.
By Elfric of Eynsham
(955-1010)

THE Jews called out to Christ, fastened to the cross, saying that ‘if he was the King of Israel, he should descend now from the cross, and they would believe in him.’

Had he had descended from the cross and not borne their mockery, then without question he would have set us no example of his fortitude; but he did remain there, did bear their mockery, and did show fortitude.

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No. 40
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Polywords (183)
Make as many words as you can from the letters of a nine-letter word.
Latest: Weir
Added on Sunday January 14th, 2018
Doublets (34)
Turn one word into another, changing just one letter each time.
Latest: Stardust
Quickwords (46)
A mini-crossword of everyday vocabulary and general knowledge.
Triplets (23)
Find one common letter that will turn three words into three new ones.
Latest: Triplet No. 23
Guess these words letter by letter – before the cats are gone!
See how ingenious you can be in combining three randomly chosen words in one sentence.
Compose sentences showing the difference in meaning, grammar or usage between these words.
Practise your basic arithmetic, from multiplation tables to percentages.
Latest: Target Number
Take command of English grammar and composition with these traditional exercises.
Latest: Letters Game
A word search game with a dash of strategy.
From our Archive
Based on the novel by Charles Dickens
(1812-1870)
and Wilkie Collins
(1824-1889)
At twenty-five and owner of his own business, Walter Wilding thought his world was secure, but it was about to be rocked to its foundations.
By Charles Dickens
(1812-1870)
Charles Dickens rails at the way Parliament and do-gooders treat the public like an irresponsible child.
Music by Charles Avison
(1709-1770)
The most important English-born composer of Handel’s day, known for his tuneful music and very busy diary.
By Samuel Smiles
(1812-1904)
A sympathetic understanding of the trials of other people is essential for getting along.
The Pope and the King of Spain decide that the time has come to rid England of her troublesome Queen, Elizabeth I.

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Polyword ‘Fen’
Make as many words as you can with the letters below. All your words must be at least four letters long, and must also include the highlighted letter. What’s the nine-letter word?

SEE how many words you can make using the letters below. All your words must be at least 4 letters long, and must include the letter (change).

We found commonly used words, plus one 9-letter word. Can you do better?

Use each letter only once. But if there are e.g. two As, you can used them both.

Don’t count proper nouns such as April, Zeus, or Newcastle (pretty much anything that has to be spelled with a capital letter at the start), or acronyms like HMRC.

Don’t just add -S for plurals or third person singular verbs, e.g. CAT → CATS or SPEAK → SPEAKS.

More Word Games
A word search game with a dash of strategy.
Guess these words letter by letter – before the cats are gone!
Do you know ‘cleansing bar’ (4 letters), and ‘Doncaster horse-race’ (2,5 letters)?
Changing one letter at a time, see if you can start with MILE and finish with POST.
Find the magic letter that can change three words into three different ones.