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Posts tagged Extracts from Literature (94)
Nos 51 to 60
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2 two-part story
Muzio Clementi
Extracts from Literature
Well Out Of It
Anne Elliot is mortified to hear Frederick Wentworth’s opinion of her, but manages to find comfort in his words.
By Jane Austen
(1775-1817)

“CAPTAIN Wentworth is not very gallant by you, Anne, though he was so attentive to me. Henrietta asked him what he thought of you, when they went away, and he said, ‘You were so altered he should not have known you again.’”

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No. 51
William Boyce
Character and Conduct
Sweet and Sour
The great Dr Johnson argues that you catch more flies with honey than with vinegar.
By Samuel Johnson
(1709-1784)

THAT a precept of courtesy is by no means unworthy of the gravity and dignity of an apostolical mandate, may be gathered from the pernicious effects which all must have observed to have arisen from harsh strictness and sour virtue; such as refuses to mingle in harmless gaiety, or give countenance to innocent amusements, or which transacts the petty business of the day with a gloomy ferociousness that clouds existence.

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No. 52
Charles Villiers Stanford
Extracts from Literature
King George V (1910-1936)
Kindergarten Politics
John Buchan didn’t think much of our ‘new manners’ in foreign policy during the 1920s.
By John Buchan
(1875-1940)

SANDY was furious about the muddle in the Near East and the mishandling of Turkey. His view was that we were doing our best to hammer a much-divided Orient into a hostile unanimity.

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No. 53
2 two-part story
Ralph Vaughan Williams
Extracts from Literature
The Duel
Sir Mulberry Hawk’s coarse conduct towards Kate Nickleby has awoken a spark of decency in Lord Frederick Verisopht.
By Charles Dickens
(1812-1870)

THEY turned to the right, and taking a track across a little meadow, passed Ham House and came into some fields beyond. In one of these, they stopped.

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No. 54
2 two-part story
Louise Farrenc
Extracts from Literature
One Last Question
English lawyer Sydney Carton goes to the guillotine in place of a French aristocrat.
By Charles Dickens
(1812-1870)

“WILL you let me ask you one last question? I am very ignorant, and it troubles me — just a little.”

“Tell me what it is.”

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No. 55
Franz Joseph Haydn
Extracts from Literature
The White Queen’s Riddle
Alice was set a poetical test of wits by the kindly (but like all the other characters, utterly maddening) White Queen.
By Lewis Carroll
(1832-1898)

“FIRST, the fish must be caught.”
That is easy: a baby, I think, could have caught it.
“Next, the fish must be bought.”
That is easy: a penny, I think, would have bought it.

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No. 56
Ignaz Moscheles
Extracts from Literature
A Perfect Combination of Imperfections
Jane Eyre meets a not very handsome stranger, and likes him all the better for it.
By Charlotte Brontë
(1816-1855)

HAD he been a handsome, heroic-looking young gentleman, I should not have dared to stand thus questioning him against his will, and offering my services unasked. I had hardly ever seen a handsome youth; never in my life spoken to one.

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No. 57
Muzio Clementi
Extracts from Literature
Swept off her Feet
Marianne Dashwood sprains an ankle, but help is at hand.
By Jane Austen
(1775-1817)

A GENTLEMAN carrying a gun, with two pointers playing round him, was passing up the hill and within a few yards of Marianne, when her accident happened. He put down his gun and ran to her assistance. She had raised herself from the ground, but her foot had been twisted in her fall, and she was scarcely able to stand. The gentleman offered his services; and passing through the garden, the gate of which had been left open by Margaret, he bore her directly into the house.

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No. 58
2 two-part story
Sir William Sterndale Bennett
Extracts from Literature
The Sign from Heaven
Was it an over-excited imagination, or an answer to prayer?
By Charlotte Brontë
(1816-1855)

“WERE I but convinced that it is God’s will I should marry you, I could vow to marry you here and now — come afterwards what would!”

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No. 59
2 two-part story
George Frideric Handel
Extracts from Literature
King George V (1910-1936)
The Summons Comes for Mr Standfast
In John Buchan’s story about the Great War, Richard Hannay must watch as his friend sacrifices his life for the Allies.
By John Buchan
(1875-1940)

THEY took Peter from the wreckage with scarcely a scar except his twisted leg. Death had smoothed out some of the age in him, and left his face much as I remembered it long ago in the Mashonaland hills.

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No. 60
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Polywords (183)
Make as many words as you can from the letters of a nine-letter word.
Latest: Weir
Added on Sunday January 14th, 2018
Doublets (34)
Turn one word into another, changing just one letter each time.
Latest: Stardust
Quickwords (46)
A mini-crossword of everyday vocabulary and general knowledge.
Triplets (23)
Find one common letter that will turn three words into three new ones.
Latest: Triplet No. 23
Guess these words letter by letter – before the cats are gone!
See how ingenious you can be in combining three randomly chosen words in one sentence.
Compose sentences showing the difference in meaning, grammar or usage between these words.
Practise your basic arithmetic, from multiplation tables to percentages.
Latest: Target Number
Take command of English grammar and composition with these traditional exercises.
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A word search game with a dash of strategy.
From our Archive
By Thomas Clarkson
(1760-1846)
Josiah Wedgwood’s promotional gift made Abolitionism fashionable.
When he caught his wife with her lover, the ugly blacksmith of the gods showed that he was not without his pride.
By Rafael Sabatini
(1865-1947)
Andre-Louis Moreau lives for vengeance on the master swordsman who killed his friend.
By Charles H. Ross
(1835-1897)
(That’s cat-tails, obviously.) And who ever said cats were unpredictable?
A civilian ferry captain was court-martialled by the Germans for thumbing his nose at their U-Boats.

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Polyword ‘Bleat’
Make as many words as you can with the letters below. All your words must be at least four letters long, and must also include the highlighted letter. What’s the nine-letter word?

SEE how many words you can make using the letters below. All your words must be at least 4 letters long, and must include the letter (change).

We found commonly used words, plus one 9-letter word. Can you do better?

Use each letter only once. But if there are e.g. two As, you can used them both.

Don’t count proper nouns such as April, Zeus, or Newcastle (pretty much anything that has to be spelled with a capital letter at the start), or acronyms like HMRC.

Don’t just add -S for plurals or third person singular verbs, e.g. CAT → CATS or SPEAK → SPEAKS.

More Word Games
A word search game with a dash of strategy.
Guess these words letter by letter – before the cats are gone!
Do you know ‘conscientious’ (7 letters), and ‘unreturned serve’ (3 letters)?
Changing one letter at a time, see if you can start with ASH and finish with OAK.
Find the magic letter that can change three words into three different ones.