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Posts tagged Poets and Poetry (26)
Nos 11 to 20
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George Butterworth
Poets and Poetry
‘Sussex’
A meditation on our instinctive love for the place in which we live.
By Rudyard Kipling
(1865-1936)

GOD gave all men all earth to love,But since our hearts are small,Ordained for each one spot should proveBelovèd over all;That, as He watched Creation’s birth,So we, in godlike mood,May of our love create our earthAnd see that it is good.

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No. 11
George Butterworth
Poets and Poetry
Queen Victoria (1837-1901) to King George VI (1936-1952)
Northumberland
A poem of nostalgia for the sea breezes and yellow gorse of Northumberland.
By Wilfrid Wilson Gibson
(1878-1962)

HEATHERLAND and bentland,
Black land and white,
God bring me to Northumberland,
The land of my delight.

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No. 12
Henry Purcell
Poets and Poetry
King Arthur’s Last Request
The legendary British warrior makes ready for his final journey, leaving Sir Bedivere with one last duty to perform.
By Alfred, Lord Tennyson
(1809-1892)

“I HAVE liv’d my life, and that which I have done
May He within himself make pure! but thou,
If thou shouldst never see my face again,
Pray for my soul.

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No. 13
2 two-part story
Charles Villiers Stanford
Poets and Poetry
Queen Victoria (1837-1901)
The Pitman Poet
Joseph Skipsey taught himself to read and write by candlelight, hundreds of feet below ground in a Northumberland pit.

AT the age of seven, Joseph Skipsey started work in his hometown colliery at Percy Main in Northumberland. He worked six to twelve hours a day – in winter, he saw the sun only on a Sunday — operating the trapdoor through which the wagons passed, and his education was limited to the alphabet.

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No. 14
John Field
Poets and Poetry
‘My Shadow’
An enduringly popular, bitter-sweet poem by the author of ‘Treasure Island’.
By Robert Louis Stevenson
(1850-1894)

I HAVE a little shadow that goes in and out with me,
And what can be the use of him is more than I can see.
He is very, very like me from the heels up to the head;
And I see him jump before me, when I jump into my bed.

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No. 15
Charles Villiers Stanford
Poets and Poetry
A Farewell
A last goodbye breathes promise of a merry meeting.
By Charles Kingsley
(1819-75)

MY fairest child, I have no song to give you; No lark could pipe to skies so dull and grey; Yet, ere we part, one lesson I can leave you For every day.

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No. 16
John Field
Poets and Poetry
The Rainbow
God’s covenant of love is a fresh joy every time it appears.
By William Wordsworth
(1770-1850)

MY heart leaps up when I behold
A rainbow in the sky:
So was it when my life began;
So is it now I am a man;
So be it when I shall grow old,
Or let me die!

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No. 17
Sir Hubert Parry
Poets and Poetry
‘If...’
A reflection on what builds real character
By Rudyard Kipling
(1865-1936)

IF you can keep your head when all about youAre losing theirs and blaming it on you,If you can trust yourself when all men doubt you,But make allowance for their doubting too;If you can wait and not be tired by waiting,Or being lied about, don’t deal in lies,Or being hated, don’t give way to hating,And yet don’t look too good, nor talk too wise:

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No. 18
Edward Elgar
Poets and Poetry
‘Hail, Liberty!’
Kipling borrowed from the Greek Independence movement to give thanks for the end of the Great War.
By Rudyard Kipling
(1865-1936)

WE knew thee of old,
Oh divinely restored,
By the light of thine eyes
And the light of thy Sword.

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No. 19
Sir William Sterndale Bennett
Poets and Poetry
Daffodils
A poem about the blessing of fond memories.
By William Wordsworth
(1770-1850)

I WANDERED lonely as a cloud
That floats on high o’er vales and hills,
When all at once I saw a crowd,
A host, of golden daffodils;
Beside the lake, beneath the trees,
Fluttering and dancing in the breeze.

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No. 20
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Polywords (183)
Make as many words as you can from the letters of a nine-letter word.
Latest: Weir
Added on Sunday January 14th, 2018
Doublets (34)
Turn one word into another, changing just one letter each time.
Latest: Stardust
Quickwords (46)
A mini-crossword of everyday vocabulary and general knowledge.
Triplets (23)
Find one common letter that will turn three words into three new ones.
Latest: Triplet No. 23
Guess these words letter by letter – before the cats are gone!
See how ingenious you can be in combining three randomly chosen words in one sentence.
Compose sentences showing the difference in meaning, grammar or usage between these words.
Practise your basic arithmetic, from multiplation tables to percentages.
Latest: Target Number
Take command of English grammar and composition with these traditional exercises.
Latest: Letters Game
A word search game with a dash of strategy.
Today in the Church
January 6 ‘English Style’ ?
The Feast of the Theophany of Jesus Christ
From our Archive
The newly-minted state of Israel’s Arab neighbours tried to prevent it taking shape, but ended up defining it.
By Samuel Smiles
(1812-1904)
George Stephenson won the admiration of French navvies by showing them how a Geordie works a shovel.
By Percy Bysshe Shelley
(1792-1822)
Poet Percy Shelley calls on November’s sister months to watch by the graveside of the dead Year.
Richard I thought a veteran Crusader and conqueror of Saladin could handle a few French peasants.
The opening of the Bombay to Thane line was the real beginning of British India.

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Top Topics
History (406)
Polywords (183)
Georgian Era (112)
Fiction (84)
Quickwords (46)
Doublets (34)
Triplets (23)
Railways (23)
Stuart Era (17)
Tudor Era (11)
Adam Smith (10)
Polyword ‘Heron’
Make as many words as you can with the letters below. All your words must be at least four letters long, and must also include the highlighted letter. What’s the nine-letter word?

SEE how many words you can make using the letters below. All your words must be at least 4 letters long, and must include the letter (change).

We found commonly used words, plus one 9-letter word. Can you do better?

Use each letter only once. But if there are e.g. two As, you can used them both.

Don’t count proper nouns such as April, Zeus, or Newcastle (pretty much anything that has to be spelled with a capital letter at the start), or acronyms like HMRC.

Don’t just add -S for plurals or third person singular verbs, e.g. CAT → CATS or SPEAK → SPEAKS.

More Word Games
A word search game with a dash of strategy.
Guess these words letter by letter – before the cats are gone!
Do you know ‘warm covering’ (7 letters), and ‘2,240 lb’ (3 letters)?
Change HIDE into AWAY, one letter at a time.
Find the magic letter that can change three words into three different ones.