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Posts tagged Lives of the Saints (96)
Nos 51 to 60
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Edward German
Lives of the Saints
Bread from Heaven
Cuthbert trusted that keeping his promised fast would not do him any harm.
Based on an account by Saint Bede of Jarrow
(672-735)

AT ten o’clock one morning, Cuthbert stopped off in a village, hoping to find something for his horse to eat; as it was a Friday and Cuthbert liked to fast until three, he declined all offers of food himself, though he had no idea when he might eat again.

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No. 51
John Field
Lives of the Saints
Wulfstan and the Seal of Approval
William the Conqueror’s purge of the English Church was halted by a humble bishop and a dead king.
Based on an account by Charlotte Yonge
(1823-1901)

THINKING all Saxon bishops rustic and unworthy of their sees, Archbishop Lanfranc summoned Wulfstan, bishop of Worcester, to a synod in the Abbey at Westmister, and ordered him to give up his pastoral staff and ring to a better man.

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No. 52
Charles Villiers Stanford
Lives of the Saints
Terror in the Deep
Irish monk St Columba is credited with being among the first witnesses to the ‘Loch Ness monster’.

THE first thing Columba saw as he went down to the River Ness, hoping to cross to the other side, was that the only boat was moored on the far bank.

The second was that on this side, some villagers were digging a grave.

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No. 53
2 two-part story
John Field
Lives of the Saints
Russian Empire (1721-1917) to Soviet Union (1917-1990)
St Elizabeth the New Martyr
The grand-daughter of Queen Victoria was as close to the poor of Moscow’s slums as she was to the Russian Tsar.

AFTER Grand Duke Sergei Alexandrovich was assassinated by Marxist revolutionary Ivan Kalyayev on 18th February 1905, his widow Elizabeth, a grand-daughter of Queen Victoria and the Tsar’s sister-in-law, went to see Kalyayev in jail.

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No. 54
John Marsh
Lives of the Saints
Roman Empire (Byzantine Era) (330 - 1453)
Stick and Carrot
The Virgin Mary and her son team up to get the best out of some careless monks.
Based on a
Byzantine Tradition

THE Abbot of the Vatopedi monastery was in the chapel alone one morning, when suddenly he heard a voice.

After looking this way and that, he realised it had come from an icon of Mary, with her child Jesus on her lap.

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No. 55
2 two-part story
John Marsh
Lives of the Saints
Roman Empire (Byzantine Era) (330 - 1453)
St Mary of Egypt
Back in the 6th century, a young woman was ruining her own life and the lives of others.

WHEN she was twelve Mary ran away from home, and became a sexual thrill-seeker so compulsive that she lived for seventeen years as a prostitute without payment, just to get her ‘fix’.

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No. 56
Sir Hubert Parry
Lives of the Saints
The Lessons of History
England’s first and greatest historian explains why history is so important.
By Saint Bede of Jarrow
(672-735)

I WARMLY welcome the genuine eagerness with which you not only apply yourself to listen most attentively to the words of Scripture, but also make the effort to acquaint yourself in detail with the sayings and doings of earlier generations, and particularly the famous men of our own nation.

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No. 57
3 three-part story
George Frideric Handel and Byzantine Chant
Lives of the Saints
St Bede of Wearmouth and Jarrow
The mild-mannered, artistic monk was nevertheless a founding father of the English nation.

THE church of St Peter in Monkwearmouth is all that remains today of a monastery founded in 674 by St Benedict Biscop, a local man who had studied abroad and was a frequent visitor to Rome.

The land was donated by Ecgfrith, King of Northumbria, and included the home of a Christian family with a one-year-old boy called Bede.

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No. 58
Edward Elgar
Lives of the Saints
Roman Empire (Roman Era) (27 BC - AD 330)
St George, Patron Saint of England
George was born in Israel and served in the Roman army, yet makes an ideal patron for England.

IN 1552, the English government forbade banners depicting Christian saints, considered idolatrous by the country’s newly Protestant churchmen. An exception was made, however, for banners of St George, popular in the army since Richard the Lionheart’s crusade to the Holy Land.

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No. 59
George Frideric Handel
Lives of the Saints
St George the Triumphant Martyr
One of the Emperor Galerius’s most trusted generals openly defied him.

IT was on 24th February 303 that Galerius issued an edict that the Christians’ churches should be demolished and their Scriptures burned, and that they should sacrifice to the traditional gods of Rome or face execution.

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No. 60
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Polywords (183)
Make as many words as you can from the letters of a nine-letter word.
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Added on Sunday January 14th, 2018
Doublets (34)
Turn one word into another, changing just one letter each time.
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A mini-crossword of everyday vocabulary and general knowledge.
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Find one common letter that will turn three words into three new ones.
Latest: Triplet No. 23
Guess these words letter by letter – before the cats are gone!
See how ingenious you can be in combining three randomly chosen words in one sentence.
Compose sentences showing the difference in meaning, grammar or usage between these words.
Practise your basic arithmetic, from multiplation tables to percentages.
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Take command of English grammar and composition with these traditional exercises.
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A word search game with a dash of strategy.
From our Archive
By Samuel Smiles
(1812-1904)
George Stephenson argued that his steam engines were solar-powered.
Benjamin Jesty and Edward Jenner continue to save millions of lives because they listened to an old wives’ tale.
Heracles must get the better of a three-bodied giant and steal his cattle.
By Henry of Huntingdon
(?1088-?1157)
King Canute enacted a memorable demonstration of the limits of government power.
Based on the account by Reginald of Durham
(12th century)
A hungry monk thought he had got away with the tastiest of crimes, but St Cuthbert kept his promise to his beloved birds.

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Polyword ‘Rare’
Make as many words as you can with the letters below. All your words must be at least four letters long, and must also include the highlighted letter. What’s the nine-letter word?

SEE how many words you can make using the letters below. All your words must be at least 4 letters long, and must include the letter (change).

We found commonly used words, plus one 9-letter word. Can you do better?

Use each letter only once. But if there are e.g. two As, you can used them both.

Don’t count proper nouns such as April, Zeus, or Newcastle (pretty much anything that has to be spelled with a capital letter at the start), or acronyms like HMRC.

Don’t just add -S for plurals or third person singular verbs, e.g. CAT → CATS or SPEAK → SPEAKS.

More Word Games
A word search game with a dash of strategy.
Guess these words letter by letter – before the cats are gone!
Do you know ‘amusing play on words’ (3 letters), and ‘leaf of a pine tree’ (6 letters)?
Changing one letter at a time, see if you can start with PIG and finish with STY.
Find the magic letter that can change three words into three different ones.