← Authorised Version Home Page

The Creed
The Creed : The inviolable statement of Christian faith read at every Communion service since the fourth century.

The Creed of Constantinople AD 381

As translated for the Book of Common Prayer of 1662 (emended)*

I BELIEVE in one God the Father Almighty, Maker of heaven and earth, of all things visible and invisible:

And in one Lord Jesus Christ, the only-begotten Son of God, Begotten of his Father before all ages, Light of Light, Very God of Very God, Begotten, not made, Being of one substance with the Father; By whom all things were made: Who for us men, and for our salvation came down from heaven, And was incarnate by the Holy Ghost and the Virgin Mary, And was made man, And was crucified also for us under Pontius Pilate. He suffered and was buried, And the third day he rose again according to the Scriptures, And ascended into heaven, And sitteth on the right hand of the Father. And he shall come again with glory to judge both the quick and the dead: Whose kingdom shall have no end.

And in the Holy Ghost, The Lord, and Giver of life, Who proceedeth from the Father,* Who with the Father and the Son together is worshipped and glorified, Who spake by the Prophets. In one Holy, Catholic and Apostolic Church. I acknowledge one Baptism for the remission of sins. And I look for the Resurrection of the dead, And the life of the world to come. Amen.

* It was composed at the Council of Constantinople in 381, and based on the Creed of Nicaea (see below). It is therefore conveniently, but incorrectly, called the ‘Nicene Creed’. The translation given here draws on the Book of Common Prayer of 1662, which is in beautiful Church English; however, the Prayer Book deviates in several places from the original Greek, and has been emended here accordingly.

* In the West, the words ‘and the Son’ have been added at this point since the 6th century, but they were not in the Creed when it was composed at the Council of Constantinople, nor when the Creed was declared unchangeable at Ephesus in 431, nor when it was reaffirmed at Chalcedon in 451. Nor is the idea to be found anywhere in Scripture. See our story ‘Filioque’.

The Creed of Nicaea AD 325*

WE BELIEVE in one God, the Father Almighty, maker of all things visible and invisible; and in one Lord Jesus Christ, the Son of God, the only-begotten of his Father, of the substance of the Father, God of God, Light of Light, very God of very God, begotten, not made, being of one substance with the Father. By whom all things were made, both which be in heaven and in earth. Who for us men and for our salvation came down and was incarnate and was made man. He suffered and the third day he rose again, and ascended into heaven. And he shall come again to judge both the quick and the dead. And in the Holy Ghost.

* Composed at the Council of Nicaea in 325. The text used here is based taken from ‘The Seven Ecumenical Councils’, edited by Philip Schaff.

Picture: © John Salmon, Geograph. Licence: CC BY-SA 2.0. View original
The Church of St Peter in Whitfield, Kent, which is believed to date back to the 8th century.

Featured Music

Selected Stories
Wonder spread through a Tyneside monastery after Bishop Cuthbert asked for a drink of water.
Henry VIII’s experts declared that saints were nothing special, but St Cuthbert had a surprise for them.
In 1910, Constantine Zervakos, a young monk from the Greek island of Paros, found himself charged with espionage.
By
Elfric of Eynsham
Elfric, Abbot of Eynsham in the reign of Æthelred the Unready, reflects on two appearances of the Holy Spirit in the New Testament.