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The Prayer of the Heart
The Prayer of the Heart : A blending of two prayers from the New Testament approved by Christ himself.

The Prayer of the Heart

LORD Jesus Christ,
have mercy upon me.

Alternatives include:

Lord Jesus Christ,
Son of God,
have mercy upon me.

Lord Jesus Christ,
Son of God,
have mercy upon me
a sinner.

* The prayer blends two prayers from the New Testament, both approved by Christ, and both entreatingly repeated. One is that of Bartimaeaus the blind man: ‘Thou Son of David, have mercy on me!’ in Mark 10:48; the other is that of the publican (tax-collector) dramatised in Jesus’s parable: ‘God be merciful to me a sinner!’ in Luke 18:13. To repeat this prayer as they did is, therefore, evidently not the ‘vain repetition’ which Jesus discouraged in Matthew 6:7.

For advice on using this and other prayers, see ‘Let us learn to pray: Part 3’ (OrthoChristian.com), compiled from the the writings of St Theophan the Recluse (1815-1894).

Picture: From Wikimedia Commons. Licence: Public domain. View original
Christ heals Bartimaeus, the blind man of Jericho, as depicted in the Codex Egberti, a Gospel book of the the Reichenau Monastery made for Egbert, bishop of Trier (r. 980–993). The plea of Bartimaeus ‘have mercy on me!’ was not the plea of a frightened criminal hoping his offence will be overlooked by a severe judge, but the plea of a blind man determined that his wretchedness will be noticed by a busy but gentle doctor, and confident of being healed.

Featured Music

Selected Stories
By Elfric of Eynsham
(955-1010)
Anglo-Saxon abbot Elfric tentatively likened the new-born Jesus to an egg.
Smarting for his outraged ‘rights’, Cain lost his reason — but not God’s pity and love.
Why did a kindly old priest refuse to show his respects to St Nektarios?
King Saul’s jealousies drove those who loved him away, but David was a very different kind of leader.