Posts tagged Character and Conduct (29)
Nos 1 to 10
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George Frederick Pinto
Extracts from Literature
Practice Makes Perfect
Making friends is, like playing music, not just a matter of natural talent.
By Jane Austen
(1775-1817)

“I CERTAINLY have not the talent which some people possess,” said Darcy, “of conversing easily with those I have never seen before. I cannot catch their tone of conversation, or appear interested in their concerns, as I often see done.”

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No. 1
John Garth
Georgian Era
Portrait of a Lady
Edmund Burke takes time off from campaigning for liberty to reflect on the delights of captivity.
By Edmund Burke MP
(1729-1797)

SHE has a face that just raises your attention at first sight; it grows on you every moment, and you wonder it did no more than raise your attention at first.

Her eyes have a mild light, but they awe you when she pleases; they command, like a good man out of office, not by authority, but by virtue.

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No. 2
William Byrd
Character and Conduct
‘Thy Necessity is Yet Greater than Mine’
Elizabethan courtier and soldier Sir Philip Sidney shows that a nobleman can also be a gentleman.
By Fulke Greville, Baron Brooke
(1554-1628)

THE weather being misty, their troops fell fatally within shot of their [the Spanish Army’s] muskets, which were laid in ambush within their own trenches. An unfortunate hand out of those trenches brake the bone of Sir Philip’s thigh with a musket-shot. The horse he rode upon, was rather furiously choleric, than bravely proud, and so forced him to forsake the field.

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No. 3
2 two-part story
Cipriani Potter
Discovery and Invention
Thomas Brassey
The unsung surveyor from Cheshire, who built railways and made friends across the world.

THOMAS Brassey, son of a prosperous Cheshire farmer, began his career in road-building as an apprentice to surveyor William Lawton, on Thomas Telford’s Shrewsbury to Holyhead road. Brassey rose from apprentice to partner, and Lawton and Brassey relocated to Birkenhead to make road-building materials.

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No. 4
Louise Farrenc
Discovery and Invention
A Leader by Example
George Stephenson won the admiration of French navvies by showing them how a Geordie works a shovel.
By Samuel Smiles
(1812-1904)

WHEN examining the works of the Orleans and Tours Railway, Mr Stephenson, seeing a large number of excavators filling and wheeling sand in a cutting, at a great waste of time and labour, went up to the men and said he would show them how to fill their barrows in half the time.

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No. 5
Samuel Wesley
Extracts from Literature
A World of Differences
Emma tries to reconcile her father to the unaccountable tastes of his nearest and dearest.
By Jane Austen
(1775-1817)

“ONCE Henry asked me for a knife, but I told him knives were only made for grandpapas. I think their father is too rough with them very often.”

“He appears rough to you,” said Emma, “because you are so very gentle yourself; but if you could compare him with other papas, you would not think him rough.”

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No. 6
Muzio Clementi
Extracts from Literature
Wild Goose Chase
Sir Walter Scott warned that schoolchildren must not expect to be entertained all the time.
By Sir Walter Scott
(1771-1832)

THE history of England is now reduced to a game at cards, and the doctrines of arithmetic may, we are assured, be sufficiently acquired by spending a few hours a week at a new and complicated edition of the Royal Game of the Goose.

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No. 7
Louise Farrenc
Character and Conduct
A Very Special Correspondent
Pauline de Meulan’s magazine Publiciste was close to going out of business when an anonymous contributor stepped in.
By Samuel Smiles
(1812-1904)

THE circumstances connected with M Guizot's courtship and marriage are curious and interesting.

While a young man living by his pen in Paris, writing books, reviews, and translations, he formed a casual acquaintance with Mademoiselle Pauline de Meulan, a lady of great ability, then editor of the Publiciste.

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No. 8
Charles Villiers Stanford
Character and Conduct
Dr Johnson and the Critic’s Ambush
A literary man tries to trick Samuel Johnson into an honest opinion, which was neither necessary nor very rewarding.
By James Boswell
(1740-1795)

AT this time the controversy concerning the pieces published by Mr James Macpherson, as translations of Ossian, was at its height. Johnson had all along denied their authenticity; and, what was still more provoking to their admirers, maintained that they had no merit.

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No. 9
Johann Christian Bach
Extracts from Literature
Education of the Heart
For Jane Austen, the best education a father can give to his child is to befriend her.
By Jane Austen
(1775-1817)

TOO late he became aware how unfavourable to the character of any young people must be the totally opposite treatment which Maria and Julia had been always experiencing at home, where the excessive indulgence and flattery of their aunt had been continually contrasted with his own severity.

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No. 10
1 2 3
Polywords (182)
Make as many words as you can from the letters of a nine-letter word.
Latest: Path
Added on Monday December 11th, 2017
Doublets (34)
Turn one word into another, changing just one letter each time.
Latest: Stardust
Quickwords (46)
A mini-crossword of everyday vocabulary and general knowledge.
Triplets (23)
Find one common letter that will turn three words into three new ones.
Latest: Triplet No. 23
Guess these words letter by letter – before the cats are gone!
See how ingenious you can be in combining three randomly chosen words in one sentence.
Compose sentences showing the difference in meaning, grammar or usage between these words.
Practise your basic arithmetic, from multiplation tables to percentages.
Latest: Target Number
Take command of English grammar and composition with these traditional exercises.
Latest: Letters Game
A word search game with a dash of strategy.
Today in History
1931 Alan Blumlein files the world’s first patent for stereo
From our Archive
When Parliament overthrew the capricious tyranny of Charles I, it discovered an uncomfortable truth about power.
Sending a hero off to ‘certain death’ never seems to work out...
Based on a fable by
Aesop of Samos
An over-excited jackdaw goes out of his league, and pays the price.
Within little more than half a century a British penal colony turned into a prosperous, free-trade democracy.
By Charlotte Yonge
(1823-1901)
A popular tale of scorched cakes and a scolded king.

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History (394)
Polywords (182)
Georgian Era (107)
Fiction (84)
Quickwords (46)
Doublets (34)
Triplets (23)
Railways (23)
Stuart Era (16)
Adam Smith (10)
Polyword ‘Clean’
Make as many words as you can with the letters below. All your words must be at least four letters long, and must also include the highlighted letter. What’s the nine-letter word?

SEE how many words you can make using the letters below. All your words must be at least 4 letters long, and must include the letter (change).

We found commonly used words, plus one 9-letter word. Can you do better?

Use each letter only once. But if there are e.g. two As, you can used them both.

Don’t count proper nouns such as April, Zeus, or Newcastle (pretty much anything that has to be spelled with a capital letter at the start), or acronyms like HMRC.

Don’t just add -S for plurals or third person singular verbs, e.g. CAT → CATS or SPEAK → SPEAKS.

More Word Games
A word search game with a dash of strategy.
Guess these words letter by letter – before the cats are gone!
Do you know ‘ocean’ (7), and ‘a famously incorruptible Roman senator’ (4)?
Changing one letter at a time, see if you can start with PIG and finish with STY.
Find the magic letter that can change three words into three different ones.