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Liberty and Prosperity (49)
1
‘No dog exchanges bones with another’
Music: Francesco Geminiani
How do we get the help of millions of people we don’t know? Only by trade.

NOBODY ever saw a dog make a fair and deliberate exchange of one bone for another with another dog.

A spaniel endeavours by a thousand attractions to engage the attention of its master who is at dinner, when it wants to be fed by him. Man has not time, however, to do this upon every occasion.

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Grammar and Composition

Distinguish using sentences: Fair. Fare.

Use as a noun and also as a verb: Want. Exchange. Show.

Use together in one sentence: Regard. Necessity. Few.

More games: Précis. Confusables. Spinner. Opposites. Verb or Noun? Active or Passive? Subject and Object. Adjectives. Word Classes.

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Buy British
Music: Malcolm Arnold
A nation with its own laws and a strong sense of shared cultural identity makes good economic sense.

EVERY individual is continually exerting himself to find out the most advantageous employment for whatever capital he can command. It is his own advantage, indeed, and not that of the society, which he has in view. But the study of his own advantage naturally, or rather necessarily, leads him to prefer that employment which is most advantageous to the society.

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Grammar and Composition

Distinguish using sentences: Must. Ought.

Use as a noun and also as a verb: Trust. Deal. Command.

Use together in one sentence: Consumption. Never. Industry.

More games: Sevens. Confusables. Spinner. Opposites. Verb or Noun? Active or Passive? Subject and Object. Adjectives. Word Classes.

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‘The Overland Mail’
Music: Charles Villiers Stanford
A tribute to the postal workers of British India, and to the kind of empire they helped to build.

IN the name of the Empress of India, make way,
O Lords of the Jungle wherever you roam,
The woods are astir at the close of the day—
We exiles are waiting for letters from Home—
Let the robber retreat; let the tiger turn tail,
In the name of the Empress the Overland-Mail!

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Grammar and Composition

Distinguish using sentences: Aware. Awake. Alert.

Use as a noun and also as a verb: Sun. Swim. Cry.

Use together in one sentence: Aglow. Above. Below.

More games: Précis. Confusables. Spinner. Opposites. Verb or Noun? Active or Passive? Subject and Object. Adjectives. Word Classes.

Big Spenders
Music: Thomas Linley the Younger
Adam Smith warns that politicians are the last people who should lecture the public about how to run their affairs.

GREAT nations are never impoverished by private, though they sometimes are by public prodigality and misconduct. The whole, or almost the whole public revenue is, in most countries, employed in maintaining unproductive hands.

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Grammar and Composition

Distinguish using sentences: There. Their. They’re.

Use as a noun and also as a verb: Court. Ruin. Trust.

Use together in one sentence: Great. Court. Extravagance.

More games: Précis. Sevens. Jigsaw. Confusables. Spinner. Opposites. Verb or Noun? Active or Passive? Subject and Object. Adjectives. Word Classes.

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Why England’s ‘Revolution’ was Glorious
Music: Henry Purcell
Edmund Burke argues that England’s ‘revolution’ of 1688 worked because we changed the Government, not the Constitution.

IN truth, the circumstances of our revolution (as it is called) and that of France, are just the reverse of each other in almost every particular, and in the whole spirit of the transaction.

With us it was the case of a legal monarch attempting arbitrary power — in France it is the case of an arbitrary monarch, beginning, from whatever cause, to legalize his authority.

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Grammar and Composition

Distinguish using sentences: Lay. Lie.

Use as a noun and also as a verb: Lie. Attempt. Make.

Use together in one sentence: Peace. Case. Former.

More games: Précis. Sevens. Confusables. Spinner. Opposites. Verb or Noun? Active or Passive? Subject and Object. Adjectives. Word Classes.

Honourable Mr Fox
Music: Thomas Linley the Younger
The colourful Foreign Secretary humbly accepted a lesson in manners from a local tradesman.

THE story is told of a tradesman calling upon him one day for the payment of a promissory note which he presented. Fox was engaged at the time in counting out gold. The tradesman asked to be paid from the money before him. “No,” said Fox, “I owe this money to Sheridan; it is a debt of honour.”

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Grammar and Composition

Distinguish using sentences: Debit. Debt.

Use as a noun and also as a verb: Say. Note. Pain.

Use together in one sentence: Promise. Such. Engaged.

More games: Précis. Sevens. Confusables. Spinner. Opposites. Verb or Noun? Active or Passive? Subject and Object. Adjectives. Word Classes.